Territory Stories

Ayakwa : a publication of the Anindilyakwa Land Council

Details:

Title

Ayakwa : a publication of the Anindilyakwa Land Council

Other title

Anindilyakwa Land Council newsletter

Creator

Anindilyakwa Land Council

Collection

Ayakwa; PublicationNT; E-Journals; Ayakwa

Date

2012-11

Location

Alyangula

Notes

Date:2012-11; October/November; Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).; This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Groote Eylandt (N.T.); Anindilyakwa Land Council; Aboriginal Australians; Land tenure; Periodicals

Publisher name

Anindilyakwa Land Council

Place of publication

Alyangula

Series

Ayakwa

Volume

Issue 11, October/November 2012 Edition

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

Anindilyakwa Land Council

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/242066

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/610757

Page content

14 | CMYK SPOT A Ayakwa | A PUBLICATION OF THE ANINDILYAKWA LAND COUNCIL EDuCaTIon Milyakburra School is continuing to use real life situations to enhance students learning. The early years class, who go by the name Terrific Tigers, have been following the Olympic Games on the website, learning about new sports, reading captions, using photos as a writing stimulus and reading the medal tally in maths to practice two digit addition. The Terrific Tigers particularly like basketball, water polo and BMX racing. Role play was used for practising English and in term three it happened in the shire council office. The students telephoned Centrelink, sent letters and found out the balance of family Basics Cards. New Principal Robert Lavulo said the students responded well to project-based and real-life learning. rEaL LIFE: Elenor Mamarika shows off her work about basketballers and rowers in this years olympic Games. Opportunities to learn in life The NSW man is sailing from Darwin to PNG to provide the secluded Sibidiri tribe with 200kg of medical supplies, educational materials and construction tools. He stopped at Groote Eylandt on his way through and spoke to school children about his adventures. It will be Crackers third trip to the region and he will be alone for the best part of six to eight months. However, a Cracker tracker device, created by mapping company Esri Australia, will monitor his journey and allow him to upload content to the internet. Crackers across the top on a MISSIon: Craig Crackers Hand talks to angurugu school children about his adventures In an effort to provide an isolated Papua new Guinea (PnG) tribe with basic supplies, Craig Crackers Hand will have to navigate danger in a 14-foot boat.