Territory Stories

Ayakwa : a publication of the Anindilyakwa Land Council

Details:

Title

Ayakwa : a publication of the Anindilyakwa Land Council

Other title

Anindilyakwa Land Council newsletter

Creator

Anindilyakwa Land Council

Collection

Ayakwa; PublicationNT; E-Journals; Ayakwa

Date

2012-11

Location

Alyangula

Notes

Date:2012-11; October/November; Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).; This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Groote Eylandt (N.T.); Anindilyakwa Land Council; Aboriginal Australians; Land tenure; Periodicals

Publisher name

Anindilyakwa Land Council

Place of publication

Alyangula

Series

Ayakwa

Volume

Issue 11, October/November 2012 Edition

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

Anindilyakwa Land Council

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/242066

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/610757

Page content

20 | CMYK SPOT A Ayakwa | A PUBLICATION OF THE ANINDILYAKWA LAND COUNCIL arT & CuLTurE Lots of activities to celebrate cultural week CELEbraTIon: Hayden bara helps paint the mural. HunTEr: a local youngster gets fresh oysters straight from the rocks. East Arnhem Shire Council sport and recreation mentor Robbie Williams helped children make posters and a big NAIDOC mural/banner. A highlight was the huge football games played between the visiting family members from Numbulwar and other mainland communities and Angurugu boys. These were called the Arnhem Versus Island Games and were played over three days with up to 30 boys playing on some days. Another highlight was combining with the Umbakumba Youth and Sport and Recreation team to take children to Thomson Bay. Robbie said a big crocodile basking in the sun on the sand bank welcomed them. We also saw a couple of pods of dolphins, cooked up plenty of huge clams that were found on the rocks and some of the young boys showed off their skills, spearing some blue swimmer crabs with a small knife, Robbie said. Lunch was topped off with some damper and fresh oysters straight from the rocks. Other NAIDOC activities included a day trip to Top Crossing and the cave paintings, a day in Angurugu for some of the younger children, the barramundi pool near Dugong Beach Resort and some more oyster hunting on the nearby rocks. Plenty of food was prepared for a community day on the oval to unveil the NAIDOC banner and join in some fun family activities. book: The Sugarbag Cost: $14.95 buy: online at www.magabala.com The Sugarbag is an adventure story of Jimmy and Max, two young brothers, who are on their way to visit their grandfather. Walking through the bush, they encounter an Australian native stingless bee buzzing around their heads. This gives Jimmy the opportunity to teach little Max all he has learned from his grandfather about hunting for sugarbag. Sugarbag is the European word for the honey produced by the stingless bee. The boys go racing through the bush in pursuit of the bee hoping it will lead them to its hive. This is Maxs first encounter with hunting for sugarbag and he doesnt really understand what they are searching for, preferring to imagine some sort of bush treasure trove filled with sweets. Sugarbag is a favourite treat for Aboriginal people. We call it ngarruu. When Grandfather was a little boy, he went hunting for ngarruu with his father, Jimmy explained proudly. Max imagined bags of sweets piled up high. Mmmm, sugarbag sounds yummy, he said, rubbing his belly. new book about a sugarbag adventure naIDoC Week offered lots of exciting activities on Groote Eylandt including a football series, barbecue, childrens outdoor activities and face painting.


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

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