Territory Stories

Northern Territory weed management handbook

Details:

Title

Northern Territory weed management handbook

Other title

Weed management handbook

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT

Date

2012

Description

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).; This manual has been developed to provide detailed information about weed control in the Northern Territory.

Notes

Date:2012; Includes: Weeds in the N.T. -- Legislative responsibilities -- Strategic & planned approaches to weed management -- Prevention -- Weed control methods -- Integrated weed control -- Using herbicides correctly -- Herbicide toxicity -- Modes of action -- Herbicide resistance -- Herbicide control techniques -- Using adjuvants, surfactants & oils with herbicides -- Factors affecting adjuvant use -- Records of use -- Disposal of excess chemicals & used chemical containers -- Chemical handling training -- Weed control option tables -- Publications -- Websites.

Language

English

Subject

Weeds -- Control; Weeds -- Northern Territory -- Identification

Publisher name

Northern Territory Government

Place of publication

Darwin

Format

53 p., : ill. (chiefly col.) ; 30 cm.

File type

application/pdf.

ISBN

9781921519482

Copyright owner

Check within Publication or with content Publisher.

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/241871

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/614065

Page content

Weed Control Option Tables 25NORTHERN TERRITORY WEED MANAGEMENT HANDBOOK 2012 Gamba grass Andropogon gayanus (Class A/C and Class B/C) (Refer to www.nt.gov.au/gamba for details) Chemical and concentration Rate Weed growth stage, method and comments Glyphosate 360 g/L Various trade names and formulations 10 mL / 1 L Seedling or adult (individuals or infestation): Foliar spray apply when actively growing Effective chemical control of gamba grass relies on spraying the entire plant. For optimal uptake of the herbicide and high mortality rates gamba grass should be sprayed when actively growing and young (leaves should be at least 40 cm long). Spraying plants prior to reaching full height will reduce time and herbicide requirements. Gamba grass is still sensitive to herbicide when fl owering. Once gamba grass is seeding and the leaves are drying out herbicide will not be effective. Non-chemical applications: Physical: Individual plants can be removed by hand or by using a mattock. Ensure the entire root mat is removed. Excess soil should be shaken or kicked off root system to ensure regrowth does not occur from the root mat. Burning: Burning will not kill gamba grass, low intensity fi res, undertaken in the Wet season, can remove rank growth improving access for slashing or spraying. Plants may need to be treated with herbicide prior to burning to create enough dry matter to carry a fi re. Fire may have the ability to carry seed in hot air currents, therefore avoid using fi re as a control method while plants are seeding. Check with the Bushfi res NT or NTFRS about permit requirements prior to lighting any fi res. Slashing: Slashing will not eradicate gamba grass, but it can reduce the biomass, prevent seeding, create an opportunity for more desirable species to establish and provide improved access to control by other means. Slash young plants prior to seed production from January to March. Ensure equipment and machinery is cleaned prior to moving to new sites. Grazing: In areas within the Class B/C declaration zone gamba grass may continue to be used in established pasture areas, however there is a requirement to disallow any further spread. Gamba being used as a pasture should be grazed with enough stock to keep grass height below 90 cm. Above this height tussocks may be avoided by stock and allowed to produce vast quantities of seed. After lightly grazing pasture in the early wet season, a stocking density of 4-5 head per hectare is required to control growth for the remainder of the wet season. Increase grazing pressure if the grass nears 90 cm. Gamba grass is not recommended for cattle production on smaller properties as it requires high stocking densities to keep it low and palatable. OPTIMUM TREATMENT TIMES darker colour indicates preferred treatment times JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC Grader grass Themeda quadrivalvis (Class B/C) Chemical and concentration Rate Weed growth stage, method and comments Glyphosate 360 g/L Various trade names and formulations 10 mL / 1 L Seedling or adult (individuals or infestation): Foliar spray apply when actively growing Non-chemical applications: Identifi cation of grader grass before seeding can be diffi cult. Small infestations should be controlled manually, preferably before seeding, and burnt on site. There is only a short window of opportunity to control grader grass as seed heads can appear within 5-6 weeks of germination, with mature seed being present after 10 weeks. If seed is present, burn it inside a drum to generate enough heat to kill the seeds. In the event that grader grass goes to seed before control, recording the location of infestations will enable early control during the next growing season. For large infestations contact WMB for options. OPTIMUM TREATMENT TIMES darker colour indicates preferred treatment times JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN JUL AUG SEP OCT NOV DEC


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