Territory Stories

The Centralian advocate Fri 22 Jun 2012

Details:

Title

The Centralian advocate Fri 22 Jun 2012

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2012-06-22

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.) -- Newspapers.; Australia, Central -- Newspapers

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Alice Springs

Volume

v. 65 no. 111

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00933

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/241373

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/619545

Page content

Centralian Advocate, Friday, June 22, 2012 5 P U B : C A D V D A T E : 2 2 -J U N -2 0 1 2 P A G E : 5 C O L O R : C M Y K Smart Living Centre 2/82 Todd St Ph 8950 4350 alicesolarcity.com.au YEAR OF ENERGY CHAMPIONS 2012 Energy champions of the week: Chris & Biggi Gosling Saving money & the environment is a win-win Whats your Energy Champion story? Chris and Biggi had an energy survey in 2009, and then a follow up survey in 2011 to help them identify further ways to save energy. To achieve a 30% saving they have: Used their In House Display to monitor energy use and look for savings Installed a variable speed pool pump, saving on pool running costs Changed to Cost shifted around 83% of their power usage to off peak times They have also installed a 1.7kW rooftop solar power system which is saving them an additional $500 per year, and through the 10:10/20:20 incentive they have claimed $250 of credits on their power bills. Save d 30% Chifl ey Alice Springs Resort 34 Stott Terrace Ph: 8952 3523 1 0 5 4 8 9 3 Adults $15.95 Kids 12 & under $12.95 Brunch Sat & Sun 6:00 am til 11:30 am collective police error TOP: Dr Peggy Dwyer and Coroner Greg Cavanagh; John McRoberts, Ian Freckelton SC and Cdr Anne Marie Murphy; Lawyer Shanna Satyer, Patsy Morton, Elaine Quinn and Janie Briscoe. BOTTOM: Janice Kershaw with Ian Freckelton; Det Sgt David Allen and Snr Det Spt Scott Pollock; Lawer Kelvin Currie, Ian Freckelton SC and Spt Megan Rowe: Lawer Scott Cornish with Briscoe family members n From previous page DAY FIVE - Mon, June 18 Constable Gareth Evans, the officer who apprehended Briscoe, was quizzed in court for more than three hours. The court heard Evans pushed Briscoe into a metal gate, causing him to stumble back then fall forward and cut his head. Once on the ground, Evans put Briscoe in a 3-point-hold and waited for other officers to arrive. The court heard Constable Evans told other officers at the watchhouse Briscoe was f...king annihilated and did notice a bleeding cut above his eye but did not administer first aid. A health assessment for Briscoe was completed by C o n s t a b l e A n t h o n y Blansjaar, who ticked unable to answer for health questions. Despite this, Constable Blansjaar deemed Briscoe fit for custody. DAY SIX - Tues, June 19 Constable Daniel Ralph, one of the officers called to back up Constable Evans, said in an emotional statement my lack of actions could have caused his death. Ralph failed to find the hidden bottle of rum. Sergeant Will McDonnell broke down in tears as he apologised to Briscoes family. McDonnell was one of two watch commanders who had overall responsibility for the watchhouse the night Briscoe died. Sergeant McDonnell said he regretted not administering first aid to Briscoe for his head injury, and agreed his behaviour on the night was insensitive. Aboriginal Community Police Officer Robyn Parker, in an emotional statement, told the court she had been rostered on as watchhouse keeper the night Briscoe died, despite policy that forbids ACPOs from being watchhouse keepers. During a cell check on Briscoe that night, Sergeant Andrew Barram also failed to administer first aid. DAY SEVEN - Weds, June 20 Police Commissioner John McRoberts issued a personal apology to Briscoes family. Constables David OKeefe and Janice Kershaw gave evidence. CCTV footage shows the pair checked the internet and an iPod while Briscoe lay dying in his cell. The pair failed to do physical regular cell checks for around 2 hours. OKeefe agreed with suggestions he had been derelict in his duty. That afternoon, Superintendent Delcene Jones of the polices Governance and Accountability told the Coroner she had raised concerns about staffing levels in the watchhouse with Commander Michael Murphy in the months preceeding Briscoes death. Constable Jones said the officer in charge flatly refused to provide adequate staff. DAY EIGHT - Thurs, June 21 Commander Michael Murphy and Assistant Commissioner Mark Payne gave evidence. Commander Murphy admitted to an inconsistency between two manuals advising officers on the regularity of cell checks. Since Briscoes death, the manuals have been updated. Assistant Commissioner Payne said since Briscoes death the NT police system had had an internal examination by an independent expert, with changes to procedure. NEWS Room for music Cameron Boon Warren H Williams THE line-up of the National Indigenous Music Awards (NIMA) was announced this week, with Central Australian country singer Warren H. Williams joining many others. However, NIMA still has room for one more unsigned indigenous artist or band. Gath apura Mununggurr, the drummer of East Journey, who are per forming at the awards night, said artists thinking of entering the competition should be brave. To be in the running, indigenous artists need to have two tracks uploaded on the Unearthed site before midnight Sunday, July 1. The National Indigenous Music Awards will be held in Darwin on August 11. Arts opening now the latest fashion Designers, models and students have worked together to produce a fashion show at Batchelor Institute Picture: CAMERON BOON Cameron Boon THE new Art and Craft building for Batchelor Institute will be officially opened this morning with a fashion show by students and local designers. Visual art lecturer Brigida Stewart said the fashion show would be a celebration of two years of waiting for the building completion at the Desert Knowledge Precinct. This will be the introduction of the building to the public, Ms Stewart said. Were having Minister Karl Hampton opening the building and theres going to be a fashion show called All Things Print. The students have made prints on fabric and paper and weve asked some designers around town to help. Everything kicks off at noon and continues until about 3pm. Vote key to drilling plans Katie Weiss A FINAL showdown over Central Petroleums chief executive position will climax today as key stakeholders cast a vote that will decide the companys future drilling prospects in the Centre. Board members will choose between former CEO John Heugh and his intermediary successor, Richard Cottee, at a meeting in Perth despite attempts to block the vote by company shareholder and Heugh supporter Clive Palmer. Mr Heugh has accused Mr Cottee, who landed a multi-billiondollar takeover deal for Queensland Gas in 2008, of incompetence. Mr Heugh said: He doesnt have the skill set to manage to cash in on Central Australian assets. If reappointed as chief executive, Mr Heugh said he would begin drilling immediately at the companys prized Surprise-1 exploration project in Central Australia to produce 1000 barrels of oil a day. Mr Heugh is demanding the company expose the amount his rival has been paid since filling in as chief executive in controversial circumstances. Mr Heugh is suing the board for ousting him in March after 15 years as chief executive, saying: Theres a distinct lack of transparency on display. After a bid to block todays meeting failed in the Supreme Court earlier this month, Mr Palmer called another meeting for July 19 in an attempt to roll the board and appoint his own members, and review Mr Cottee s pay. Mr Palmer owns 4.8 per cent of the company. Mr Heugh suspected Mr Cottee had been paid about $170 million since his appointment, which included shares. Mr Heugh said the companys mining p r o s p e c t s a c r o s s 270,000sq km of land in the Centre were fairly unpredictable. If Palmers people dont take to Cottee, t h e r e c o u l d b e trouble, he said. Central Petroleum chief operating officer Dalton Hallgren did not return the Centralian Advocates calls.