Territory Stories

The Centralian advocate Fri 22 Jun 2012

Details:

Title

The Centralian advocate Fri 22 Jun 2012

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2012-06-22

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.) -- Newspapers.; Australia, Central -- Newspapers

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Alice Springs

Volume

v. 65 no. 111

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00933

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/241373

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/619545

Page content

1060259v1 Centralian Advocate, Friday, June 22, 2012 45 P U B : C A D V D A T E : 2 2 -J U N -2 0 1 2 P A G E : 4 5 C O L O R : C M Y K Devil is in the detail FRED Nerk was a good bloke and a hard worker. By the time he died, he had accumulated significant property assets, a good bank account and several valuable insurance policies that matured upon his death. He had a partner but no other living relatives. He had supported a number of orphans for some time before his death. When he was drawing up his will, he wanted to provide for the continued support of the orphans. He purchased a do-ityourself will kit from a newsagent, filled it in by hand and had it witnessed. He left his house, bank account and the value of his insurance policies to his partner. His other property assets he left entirely to the orphans. I t s e e m e d v e r y straightforward. Some years later, just before he died, Fred amended his will by adding a codicil. The codicil substantially changed how the property originally left to the orphans was to be dealt with. The executor was to sell the property and divide the net proceeds between the orphans and Freds partner. The orphans share was to be invested. Problems emerged. The scant details in the original will and subsequent codicil gave the executor little guidance on how to resolve any problems, and the executor did not want to take responsibility for the investments or tie up the orphans entitlements. Another problem was that although Freds maturing insurance policies were left in the will to his partner, the policies themselves had contrary directions as to the distribution of the proceeds. Half the proceeds were marked for Third World charities. Such problems are not insurmountable but c o u l d h a v e b e e n avoided if proper advice had been sought at the beginning and a detailed will prepared by a professional. TRAVEL AND LIFESTYLE Mitchell in eye of storm Central Australians Travelling Tales Wish YOU WERE HERE LEFT: Billboard in Amarillo, Texas. BELOW LEFT: Mitchell Childs. BELOW: Ubud, Bali RIGHT: Chasing tornadoes in the US MITCHELL Childs recently returned from a three-week holiday in America where he chased tornados. He talks to Corey Sinclair about his holiday experiences. Where did you holiday growing up? My family and I would holiday in Katherine or Timor, Indonesia. Both excellent places to go. W h a t w a s y o u r favourite holiday destination? So far my favourite holiday destination is the USA. What is the best hotel youve stayed in? The best hotel I stayed in was the Holiday Inn Express, Denver, Colorado, near the airport but not close enough for aircraft to disturb sleep. Close to restaurants and service stations for late-night snacks. What is your most treasured souvenir? Memories are the most treasured souvenir. What was the best gift souvenir you brought back for someone? An Oscar award I bought in Hollywood that has Best Family written on it. How did you like the currency in terms of prices? I must admit I didnt think about it that often. What countries have you been to? Indonesia, New Zealand and USA. What is the craziest thing you saw overseas? The Hollywood Walk of Fame and the various street artists/performers, from snakes to the chief from the Halo games . . . What would you caution a first-time traveller? Dont go off with someone strange to get money from an ATM, even if its in a popular tourist destination. You dont know what could happen. W h a t w a s t h e weirdest thing you ate overseas? I ate frog legs in Ubud, Bali, Indonesia, and I also ate 1.7 kilos of steak and three prawns in one hour in Amarillo, Texas. What was your biggest packing mistake? Not taking an appropriate wall plug to charge all my electronic items! What is your least favourite part of holidays? Returning home. I made some awesome new friends and did not want to return. What was your most memorable experi ence? Driving on to the famed Fort Knox base, which also serves as an army base, and second was having a tornado form directly over our heads. After we left the spot a tornado touched down, taking out the powerlines we were standing under. W h a t w a s y o u r favourite nightlife? Favourite nightlife was in Saint Cloud, Minnesota. There were three birthdays and one anniversary on the same day. We went out for the night with some of the g u y s f r o m t h e hit TV show Storm C h a s e r s R e e d Timmer and Chris Chittick. Do you prefer travelling with friends or in tour groups? As this was my first overseas trip on my own, I initially travelled on my own then went on a 10-day tour. Both had their own pros and cons but overall better to travel with a tour group; make new friends and awesome memories. If you could go anywhere all expenses paid, where would it be? I would return to the USA for their tornado season, traditionally from April to June. Where is the next place you plan to holiday? Off to South Africa for a three-week camping trip from Johannesburg to Cape Town. Where did you go on your last holiday? My last holiday was three weeks in the USA. It was my first time to the USA. I went on a tour of three fire stations, a Jim Beam distillery nearby and an Aussiethemed restaurant with two dishes with Alice Springs in their name. I also went to a gun range, did the Walk of Fame and walked most of Sunset Blvd. I also went on a 10-day storm/tornadochasing tour. We got to chase with Reed Timmer, Chris Chittick (they ride in the Dominator 2) and their support crew (TVN) and also had a few social nights with them. Where have you been in Central Australia? I have lived in Central Australia for 18 years and have been camping since I was a few months old. So I have been everywhere man. Where do you plan to go next in Central Australia? Possibly Trephina Gorge or Simpsons Gap. Crowd along for ride Laura Asmussen at the Lone Dingo Point to Point Picture: DEBBIE HELLER Mountain Biking RED CENTREwith Nic Learmonth MOUNTAIN bike races arent just about riding; last Sundays Lone Dingo Point to Point (P2P) attracted many non-riding supporters. Run by the Central Australian Rough Riders (CARR), the Lone Dingo P2P was held at the Transport Hall of Fame (RTHF). Organiser Ben Gooley was so impressed with the RTHF as a venue that he broke with P2P tradition to start and finish the 26km course there. Supporters relaxed at the RTHF during the race, and the presentations were held at the RTHFs Ghan Museum Tearooms. Mr Gooley said: I think we ate them out of cake. Liz Martin from the RTHF said: Its all about community. We welcome the club back any time. The Lone Dingo sponsored the event and donated the prize pool, and owner Simon Reu said: I was pleased to be involved in an event like this. Mr Reu said he looked forward to further involvement with CARR. In a second break with tradition, the prizes were given out to riders and volunteers in a raffle. Mr Gooley said: It was good to be able to look after the people who come along just to have fun. Tanya Antonelli, who was helping in the timing tent, won a stubby-cooler. Mrs Antonelli, who owns Mt Gillen Subway, often supports CARR events. She said: Its nice that everyone can be involved, not just the riders. Gardening in Alice with iin Allliiicccee wwiith Geoff Miers Health tips for indoor plants F inding small plants for indoors can be challenging. However, there are a number of tropical and rainforest plants that will thrive indoors on a table, office desk, or in a corner of the room. Indoor plants, when given a good soak as required, are liquid fed on a regular basis and repotted once a year, should thrive for years. Small indoor plants should be taken outdoors every five to seven days and given a deep soaking. This is much better than a little water more frequently, as the majority o f p l a n t r o o t s a r e close to the bottom of the pot. While some plants actually thrive sitting in a tray of water, many resent having constantly wet feet. Liquid fertilising your pot plants regularly will ensure the plants have enough necessary nutrients to maintain good, healthy growth and keep looking good. If using a liquid ferti liser such as Thrive Concentrate for household plants, it is recommended that during active plant growth 5ml in two litres of water be applied every five to 10 days. At other times, apply every two to three weeks with the rate of 10ml per two litres. Apply liquid fertiliser after watering as the liquid fertiliser shouldnt be applied to dry soil. Indoor plants should not be left to grow in the same soil for long periods. E v e r y 1 2 months, change the soil medium the plants are growing in and use only a premium potting mix. Watch also for pest problems with scale, mealy bug and spider mite the main pests likely to affect your indoor plants. A regular wipe or spray with white oil will keep scale insects and spider mite under control. Two of the best nofuss plants for ind o o r s a r e t h e Spathiphyllum or peace lily and the B e a u c a r n e a recurbata or pony tail plant. The peace l i ly forms a clump of dark green glossy leaves with periodically a white, cobra-shaped s w e e t l y - s c e n t e d flower appearing. The Beaucarneaa recurbata or pony tail is a foliage plant with masses of strappy long leaves emerging from a central growth column.