Territory Stories

The Centralian advocate Tue 6 Dec 2011

Details:

Title

The Centralian advocate Tue 6 Dec 2011

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2011-12-06

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.) -- Newspapers.; Australia, Central -- Newspapers

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Alice Springs

Volume

v. 65 no. 57

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00226

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/237035

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/639954

Page content

Centralian Advocate, Tuesday, December 6, 2011 3 P U B : C A D V D A T E : 6 -D E C -2 0 1 1 P A G E : 3 C O L O R : C M Y K NEWS 2 5 2 3 0 2 /1 2 Champion brings out the equine best Horseman Ian Francis conducted a Horsemanship course for stations surrounding Alice Springs. FROM LEFT: Gaynor Chambers, John McMaster, Steven Cadzow, Bec Cadzow, Stephen Turner, Darcey Turner, Rebecca Cook, Marian Reilly, Robyn Cadzow and Chris Clark and in the front row, Zoe McMaster, Kimberley McMaster, Ian Francis (front), Brad Pearson, Eliza Pearson and Karyn Clark Troy Walsh Picture: JUSTIN BRIERTY MASTER horseman Ian Francis has been sharing his knowledge and skills at the Bohning Yards over the past three days at one of his internationally-acclaimed horsemanship clinics for the first time in Alice Springs. Kim McMaster from Numery Station, who organised the clinic, said it was tough to get him to Alice Springs as he is in such high demand. Mr Francis has been called the best horseman in the world, with good reason. His credentials are long and they include five-time Australian National Reining Horse Association (NRHA) Open Futurity champion, Australian National Cutting Horse Association (NCHA) Futurity Champion three times and twice the Cloncurry Stockmans Challenge champion. The 66-year-old horseman stopped competing in events this year as he now does his clinics full-time. Comments from the 15 participants after three days with Mr Francis at the Alice Springs clinic reflected on his talent. Unbelievable said Kimberly McMaster, the first one to speak up: His advice was really working and we could see the improvement so quickly, she said. Participants included award-winning professionals from Central Australian stations and hobbyists from Alice Springs. Most of the horse riders had come at least a few hundred kilometres for the master horsemans first visit to Alice Springs, including Rebecca Cook from Suplejack Station, 900km north of Alice Springs. Mr Francis himself had just come from Katherine and recently toured New Zealand doing clinics. He also does a couple of trips to the USA each year: No point taking my experience to the grave, Mr Francis said. On January 26 this year he was recognised for his contributions to the equine industry with an Order of Australia Medal. Alice ALP says no U-exports Erin Jones Alice ALPs Rowan Foley THE Alice Springs ALP branch has announced it does not support the export of uranium to India, despite a national ALP policy change in favour of exports. Delegates at the National Labor Party conference last weekend overturned the longstanding ban with 206 to 185 in favour of the policy change. Since the announcement, NT Chief Minister Paul Henderson is said to be investigating a trade mission to India promoting the Territory for investment. Alice Springs branch president Rowan Foley said the local branch did not support the change because India has not signed the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. He said: India hasnt signed the treaty and the sale of uranium may then free up existing stockpiles going to nuclear weapons. There is also an issue with the waste. I dont think we have clearly determined the waste industry as yet. Prime Minister Julia Gillard said the sale of uranium would be based on a new safeguards agreement as it is one of three nations that have not signed the nuclear treaty. However, Mr Foley said another main topic was gay marriage. He said: We had a great victory on marriage equality and I voted yes on that and it was a wonderful outcome. But major news was the support of a motion to create a national disa b i l i t y i n s u r a n c e scheme. Mr Foley said: That is as groundbreaking as medicare and any scheme that has national coverage particularly in this area is truly a game changer. The scheme would cover the costs of treatment and care of any Australian with a significant disability or debilitating illness. Work has already begun to create the scheme that has been described by the Assistant Treasurer Bill Shorten as bigger than climate change. Medical concerns for attacked guard THE 35-year-old male prison officer who allegedly had boiling water thrown in his face by a prisoner last week has been released from hospital. Phil Kilbrook, president of the NT Prison Officers Association, said the prison officer is now recovering at home. He said: His eyes at this stage appear to be fine. That was our first concern, but we are still concerned about infection. Police are investigating. Town camp talks TOWN camp service delivery could be the responsibility of the Alice Springs Town Council from 2013 if the Federal Government agrees to a 10-year service agreement. Council CEO Rex Mooney is negotiating with the Federal Government after it proposed council should take over service delivery from Tangentyere Council for one year at a cost of $1 million. Council rejected the original proposal, fearing ratepayers would foot the bill after the contract was complete. Mr Mooney said: The first step will be for the government to organise a service delivery provider for the next 12 months, so thats where the negotiations will take place in detail. Council will only continue its rubbish removal and dog control in town camps until an agreement can be met.


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