Territory Stories

The Northern Territory news Mon 12 Dec 2011

Details:

Title

The Northern Territory news Mon 12 Dec 2011

Other title

NT news

Collection

The Northern Territory news; NewspaperNT

Date

2011-12-12

Description

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Darwin

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/236725

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/640859

Page content

www.ntnews.com.au Monday, December 12, 2011. NT NEWS. 11 P U B : NTNE-WS-DA-TE:12-DGE:11 CO-LO-R: C-M Y-K ntnews.com.aul l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l l WORLD Tired delegates are seen working until the early hours of the morning during the informal plenary on the final day of negotiations of the COP17 Climate Change Conference in Durban Climate program reached DURBAN: A United Nations climate conference has reached a hard-fought agreement on a far-reaching program meant to set a new course for the global fight against climate change. The 194-party conference agreed to start negotiations on a new accord that would ensure that countries will be legally bound to carry out any pledges they make. It would take effect by 2020 at the latest. The deal doesnt explicitly compel any nation to take on emissions targets, although most emerging economies have volunteered to curb the growth of their emissions. Currently, only industrial countries have legally binding emissions targets under the 1997 Kyoto Protocol. Those commitments expire next year, but they will be extended for at least another five years under the accord adopted on Sunday a key demand by developing countries seeking to preserve the only existing treaty regulating carbon emissions. This is a very significant package none of us likes everything in it. Believe me, there is plenty the United States is not thrilled about, said US envoy Todd Stern. Russians out in force for change By DMITRY ZAKS MOSCOW: Russians looked for the first signs of change yesterday after tens of thousands rallied across the country and swarmed into the city in the biggest show of defiance against Vladimir Putins 12-year rule. Saturdays historic demonstrations near the Kremlin saw more than 50,000 chant Russia without Putin deriding his ruling United Russia party for its narrow victory in the December 4 elections allegedly riddled with fraud. The show of public anger was unprecedented for a city that emerged from the tumultuous 1990s as the birthplace of the managed democracy system Mr Putin set up across Russia on his rise to the presidency in 2000. The former KGB chief now serves as premier. This months legislative poll was seen as a litmus test of Mr Putins decision to return to the Kremlin for up to 12 more years in March elections that he seemed destined to win. But scenes similar to Moscows rallies on Saturday happened on a smaller scale across the industrial hubs of Siberia and the Urals - a sign that Mr Putins path back may be more fraught than it appeared just a week ago. Right now there is actually a chance for us to change something, said 44-year-old Anna Bekhmentova as the demonstrators chanted No to a police state!. No one I know voted for United Russia, said Ms Bekhmentova, in reference to a party the opposition has branded as swindlers and thieves. Mr Putins planned jobswap with President Dmitry Medvedev saw his impressive popularity ratings take a surprise hit amid grumblings the people were never consulted about who should lead their country next. Meanwhile, the opposition to Mr Putin is expanding beyond a narrow base of veteran liberals and far-Right nationalists to attract popular cultural figures such as the detective story writer Boris Akunin. I have not seen Moscow like this for 20 years, Mr Akunin told the crowd gathered in Moscow. State television - scorned by the internet community for its blanket ban on coverage of post-election unrest took the unusual step of leading its Saturday-evening news program with coverage of the Moscow rally.


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