Territory Stories

Snippets

Details:

Title

Snippets

Creator

Darwin Patchworkers & Quilters Inc.

Collection

Snippets; E-Journals; PublicationNT; Snippets

Date

2011-10

Location

Winnellie

Notes

This publication contains many links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.; Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).; Established 1 May 1984

Language

English

Subject

Darwin Patchworkers & Quilters Inc; Patchwork; Quilting; Periodicals

Publisher name

Darwin Patchworkers & Quilters Inc.

Place of publication

Winnellie

Series

Snippets

Volume

Newsletter, October 2011

File type

application/pdf

ISSN

1032-1349

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

Darwin Patchworkers & Quilters Inc.

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00042

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/234934

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/652734

Page content

Page 6 of 10 Recipe Rhubarb Coconut Cake Ingredients: 1 cups (225gms) self-raising flour 1 cups (275gms) caster sugar 1 cups (110gms) desiccated coconut 125gms butter (melted) 3 eggs, beaten lightly cup (125ml) milk teaspoon vanilla extract cup (90gms) finely chopped rhubarb 2 stalks rhubarb, extra 2 tablespoons Demerara sugar Serves 10 to 12. Can be made two days ahead. Method: Preheat oven to moderate - 180C. Grease a deep 20cm round cake pan; line the base with baking paper. Combine flour, caster sugar and coconut in a medium bowl; stir in butter, eggs, milk and extract until combined. Spread half the cake mixture into the prepared pan; scatter chopped rhubarb evenly over cake mixture. Spread remaining batter over the rhubarb. Cut extra rhubarb into 5cm lengths. Arrange rhubarb pieces over top of cake, sprinkle with Demerara sugar. Bake in a moderate oven for about 1 hour. Stand cake in pan for 5 minutes; turn onto wire rack to cool. Suitable to freeze. Not suitable to microwave. Jane Price From The Australian Womens Weekly August, 2002 IF YOU ARE TRAVELLING. September 30 - October 23 Dare to Differ 2011 - Contemporary Quilts - bi-annual exhibition of art quilts from around Australia. Sponsored by QGSA Inc. Gallery M, Marion Cultural Centre, Marion SA November 3-6 Festival of Quilts - annual exhibition of Quilters Guild of South Australia Inc. Goyder Pavilion, Adelaide Showground, Wayville SA November 3-6 International Quilt Festival - Houston (USA). George R Brown Convention Centre, Houston TX November 11 - December 21 Forest Threads - annual exhibition of art quilts sponsored by AQIPP-AQA. Box Hill Art Space, Station Street, Box Hill, Vic. December 11-23 & January 2-29 2012 One Step Further - annual exhibition of art quilts from around Australia by VQ. Wangaratta Art Gallery, Vic Miniature Quilt Challenge At the clubs general meeting on Monday 5th September, Annie Radomski issued a challenge to DP&Q members to make and enter a miniature quilt in the Territory Quilts 2013 exhibition. This came about after Annie noticed that there were only two entries in the miniature quilt section at TQ13. In consultation with Jenny Armour, the following specifications have been developed by Annie and Jenny to clarify the criteria for entry. 1. Maximum size 50cm x 50cm. 2. The must be a scale model (reduction) of a full-sized quilt - i.e. Have the same number of blocks as a full-sized quilt. 3. Must have a minimum of three layers. 4. The patchwork can be: foundation pieced; paper pieced; traditional machine pieced; hand pieced; 5. The quilt can be whole cloth. 6. The quilt can have appliqu which can be by hand or machine. 7. Quilting can be by hand or by domestic machine 8. The quilt can be embellished with: embroidery beading painting drawing 9. The quilt must have a sleeve at the top for hanging. Jenny Armour has kindly agreed to teach anyone interested in a one-day workshop. See page 3


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

We use temporary cookies on this site to provide functionality.
By continuing to use this site without changing your settings, you consent to our use of cookies.