Territory Stories

The Centralian advocate Fri 18 Dec 2009

Details:

Title

The Centralian advocate Fri 18 Dec 2009

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2009-12-18

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.) -- Newspapers.; Australia, Central -- Newspapers

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Alice Springs

Volume

v. 63 no. 59

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C01000

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/234459

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/654453

Page content

Centralian Advocate, Friday, December 18, 2009 11 P U B : C A D V D A T E : 1 8 -D E C -2 0 0 9 P A G E : 1 1 C O L O R : C M Y K NEWS 15% off recharge. Charge into Coles. Offer valid 17/12/09 until 24/12/09. 5 1 2 5 0 5 /1 0 $32.5m change of focus Daniel Burdon Kim Carr Jan Ferguson This is a completely different ballgame from what we had in the past we have learnt from the DKCRC and we knew if we were going to make the change needed for remote Australia, then it had to be an economic change THE future of the Desert Knowledge Cooperative Research Centre has been sealed with a pledge of $32.5 million over seven years from the Federal Government. The DKCRC will become the Cooperative Research Centre for Remote Economic Participation, with a renewed focus on dev e l o p i n g r e m o t e communities through new businesses and education. DKCRC managing director Jan Ferguson said it was a great day for remote Australia, and that Federal Innovation Minister Kim Carr had given the organisation a vote of confidence for its current and future work. She said: This is a completely different ball game from what we had in the past. We have learnt from the DKCRC and we knew if we were going to make the change needed for remote Australia, then it had to be an economic change. The DKCRC was responsible for many developments in ecological research, working with pastoralists and indigenous communities alike, but was probably best known for its work on a report on the feral camel problem in Central Australia. Ms Ferguson said the funding for the new CRC-REP was a specific document that outlined defined goals for the new organisation. During a 15-year period, the new organisation aims to develop new ways to strengthen regional economies, build new businesses and jobs in remote areas and improve education and training pathways for people living in remote areas. While the CRC-REP will have about 60 partners across the country and the administrative side of the organisation will likely stay the same, r e s e a r c h e r s m a y change. Ms Ferguson said there would be several indigenous researchers, who would work directly with the CRCREP.