Territory Stories

The Northern Territory news Mon 25 Jul 2011

Details:

Title

The Northern Territory news Mon 25 Jul 2011

Other title

NT news

Collection

The Northern Territory news; NewspaperNT

Date

2011-07-25

Description

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Darwin

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/233905

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/655505

Page content

www.ntnews.com.au Monday, July 25, 2011. NT NEWS. 11 P U B : N T N E W S D A T E : 2 5 -J U L -2 0 1 1 P A G E : 1 1 C O L O R : C M Y K Just no logic to hate Murdoch haters have become hysterical in the wake of the News of the World scandal, says Andrew Bolt THE BBC reporter ringing from London had a question for me, a columnist on one of Rupert Murdochs papers. Will you resign? she asked me. After all, see what Murdoch minions did at the News of the World in London? Yes, so evil is Murdoch considered by the Left, it made sense to this woman that even employees in Australia would prefer to resign rather than work for him. Wow. As if I needed a reminder of how hysterical the Murdoch haters have become, and in orgasmically vengeful ways that threaten you, too. Heres the scandal. Several journalists on one tabloid newspaper in the News Corp empire some years ago allegedly hacked phones, paid off police and in one particularly disgusting case rummaged through the phone messages of a kidnapped and murdered schoolgirl. Almost all Murdochs 53,000 employees would consider such behaviour vile. He says hes appalled, and has closed the News of the World. But, as I tried to tell the BBC, what happened in London seemed more a reflection of British culture than of Murdoch and his empire. No one has alleged that Murdoch papers in Australia, for instance, have hacked phones, bribed police or paid crooks to steal information. Thats very English. Indeed, on Thursday came news that British police had reopened investigations into the client list of a private investigator hired by News of the World a list including 300 journalists from 31 publications, including the nonMurdoch Daily Mail and the Left-leaning Daily Mirror. Those journalists reportedly lodged some 4000 requests for confidential information, much of it obtained illegally. Yes, theres something about the British public and its appetites that has invited such wide-boy journalism, with its grotesque impertinences, envious prying and gleeful comeuppances, little of which would be tolerated by the public here. Nor would much of it be tolerated by our laws, which al ready make it an offence to hack into stored communications, including SMS and voicemail messages. Thats not to say there havent been journalists who have breached the privacy of those they write about or even used stolen information. Its just that they happen to be among those jeering loudest at Murdoch. Take Bruce Guthrie, a sacked editor of the Herald Sun who is now claiming hed known Murdoch as a boss who saw ethics or, at least, the discussion of them, as an inconvenience. Yet Guthrie not only worked happily for such a man, but then wrote a book in which he reported on dozens of private conversations with his former colleagues, including two with me, breaching my privacy. Or see The Age, thundering that Murdoch must go, and gloating how its own code ruled out the unethical and illegal behaviour that has been exposed in Britain. Well, ours does too, actually. Yet this same Age signed a deal for the exclusive local access to thousands of stolen US diplomatic cables that it has published with little public benefit to excuse it. Of course, the hypocrisy and kick-them-while-theyredown instinct of competitors is understandable. What is mad, though, is the conviction among many of the Left that Murdoch is truly evil and unimaginably powerful. Ive seen columnists and politicians describe the humbling of Murdoch as like the fall of the Berlin Wall or the opening of a jail. Hence that question from the BBC. You can see where this comes from. The Left has long claimed it speaks for the masses, yet Murdoch has exposed this fiction, simply by offering the public alternative voices in the media: conservative ones. Thats been the secret to his success. He hasnt forced anyone to read The Sun in London or watch Fox News in the US. Hes simply offered a choice, and most times the public prefers what hes selling. But who in the Left wants to believe theyve been shunned by the masses? Its far easier to think the mob was tricked by a shyster with evil powers that should be curbed by law. But all that hyperventilating would be just an intellectual freak show, if the Gillard Government and the Greens hadnt seized on this excuse for some payback. The Greens have long been furious at the scrutiny Murdoch papers such as The Australian have given their madder policies, when they get a pass from the ABC and Fairfax press. Likewise, although half the Murdoch papers here foolishly backed the government at the last federal election, Prime Minister Julia Gillard and Communications Minister Stephen Conroy are convinced they are all now campaigning for regime change. The Government overlooks the fact that its been so terrible that no responsible paper could avoid printing the awful truth. And it also makes the Lefts mistake of treating the public as fools who must have been convinced not by their eyes but by the Murdoch spin. But see what the Greens and Labor now threaten, hoping to intimidate the Murdoch papers. Greens leader Bob Brown wants an inquiry into the ownership of papers by for eigners such as Murdoch, and into the range of opinions they offer. Given he was shaking a copy of The Australian as he spoke, we know which opinions he wants fewer of. Gillard says shes open to an inquiry, and claims Murdoch papers in Australia have hard questions to answer because some reporters on one British paper once did bad things. Hmmm. And Justice Minister Brendan OConnor claims the News of the World scandal shows we need new laws for a right to privacy, further eroding free speech, even though what was done there is already illegal here. Of course, these threats arent only to cow the Murdoch press. The Government is also trying to deflect from its failures. And look at this column. Its worked. Or not. TXTS of theweek If youmust subject us to Bolt, at least give us Kris Keogh aswell. Please, do add amatching column for Kris - NT Newswould bemuch enriched.Rik, Coconut Grove Andrew Bolts rants and raves need a balanced and factual counterpart. Kris a local gets my vote.Matt fromWoolner They said it The next thing I sawwas the rock coming from behind the truck straight atme. Itwas like a bloody bullet. Darryl ONeill whosewifewas killed in the passenger seat next to himwhen a small boulder crashed through the couples windscreen on the Arnhem Highway last week. Territorymoment The Territorys own horny bird, Edward the Emu, became a victim of his need for nooky. After repeatedly bailing up his owner Petrena Ariston, she decided to find him a lady friend. But Edwinawas Edwards downfall. As the NT News learnt last week shewas responsible for her lovers death. Edwina it was kind of her fault, said Ms Ariston of Edwards escape from their Katherine property and subsequent death.


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