Territory Stories

The Centralian advocate Fri 7 Aug 2009

Details:

Title

The Centralian advocate Fri 7 Aug 2009

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2009-08-07

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.) -- Newspapers.; Australia, Central -- Newspapers

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Alice Springs

Volume

v. 63 no. 22

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00673

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/233714

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/655974

Page content

10 Centralian Advocate, Friday, August 7, 2009 P U B : C A D V D A T E : 7 -A U G -2 0 0 9 P A G E : 1 0 C O L O R : C M Y K 230605/10 NEWS Sniffing slashed by 90 per cent Daniel Burdon THE number of sniffers in Alice Springs has been slashed by 90 per cent since 2004, according to a Centralian youth worker. This is despite a man being charged on Wednesday, accused of supplying three teenage girls with glue stolen from a hardware store (see story this page). Blair McFarland, of the Central Australian Australian Youth Link-Up Service, said they had worked with several other agencies in the region for several years to combat inhalant abuse. Mr McFarland said the roll-out of AVGAS, a high-octane aviation fuel, in Central Australian communities in 2004 caused an influx of about 100 petrol sniffers into Alice Springs. But he said the CAYLUS program had been working with police and town retailers since 2004 to reduce the supply of inhalants by locking up products such as glue behind the counter. He said the program had been a huge success, and thanked retailers for coming on board. Mr McFarland said before the program, some retailers thought they had a duty to sell products to customers. But through police education, traders found that they were required by law not to sell such products if they had suspicions that the sniffable product would be abused. Mr McFarland said two steps had been instrumental in fighting inhalant abuse the Volatile Substance Abuse Prevention Act and the roll-out of Opal fuel. Training boosted Bruce Walker, Jim Bray, Jenny Kroker and Warren Snowdon announce the training boost. THE Centre for Appropriate Technology is to get a $1.5 million training set-up at the Desert Knowledge Precinct. Federal MP for Lingiari Warren Snowdon said funding of the project recognised the need for improved infrastructure to support community education and training. He said: CAT will be receiving $1.5 million so that Territorians can be locally trained in the construction of houses and accommodation for our communities. CAT Chairman Jim Bray was delighted at this support for expanded training opportunities for Aboriginal people in Central Australia. He said: We expect 25 learners a year will be transitioned into employment from 2010/11. He hopes the new facility will bring industry and communities together in the construction industry. Chris Ward Glue thieves nabbed A MAN will face court later this month on charges of supplying a volatile substance, stolen from Mitre 10 on Monday, to three teenagers. Security footage from the Wilkinson Street hardware store shows a 28-year-old man and three teenage girls aged 13, 16 and 17 unlawfully entering the building and stealing glue. Police said it appeared the group then returned to Larapinta Valley Camp where the man distributed the glue. The three females were believed to have broken into Mitre 10 again the following night. They face juvenile diversion.


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