Territory Stories

The Centralian advocate Tue 5 Aug 2008

Details:

Title

The Centralian advocate Tue 5 Aug 2008

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2008-08-05

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.) -- Newspapers.; Australia, Central -- Newspapers

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Alice Springs

Volume

v. 62 no. 21

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00680

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/233423

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/657108

Page content

2 Centralian Advocate, Tuesday, August 5, 2008 PU B : C A D V D A T E : 5-A U G -2008 PA G E : 2 C O L O R : C M Y K LOTTO DRAW 2821: SUPER 66: 3, 42, 9, 14, 40, 24 Supps: 36, 28 4, 8, 6, 8, 5, 6 INDEX OPINION FINANCE TV GUIDE COMICS CENTRE SERVICES CLASSIES SPORT 6 11 15 20 22 24 27 32 06 02 /0 9 NEWS Gilligans project crashes, despite more tourists coming to Alice From Page 1 The proposedAlice Springs development would have had 103 fourperson suites to house 412 people. Mr Lewsey also blamed flight cuts for putting the site on the market. But when reminded Tiger Airways had begun services this year to Alice Springs he again pointed tounder-performing investments. He said: The old share market has been hit for six, and at the moment the money may not be in Alice. The sign has been up for only three or four days, so were seeing whats out there before making a decision. Who knows? In six months the market may turn around. TourismCentralAustralia chief executive Peter Grigg did not believe Gilligans decision was a body blow for the region. Mr Grigg said there were a number of property investors interested in the site. He said: Its probably Australia and not Central Australia thats slowing down. Probuild project manager Mark Manuell said work was still under way to demolish the site over the next three weeks. Tourism rides tail of Tiger Christopher OLeary ARRIVALS at Alice Springs Airport rose by more than 30,000 in the past financial year. Passenger traffic jumped from 542,726 in 2006/07 to 572,748. The increase came about with the start of cheap Tiger flights to Melbourne and the resulting price war with Qantas, according to NT Airports CEO Ian Kew. Tiger spokesman Matt Hobbs said: Were averaging threequarter full planes and that is a testament to tourists coming in and the people of Central Australia supporting the service. Tiger, which last week scrapped its Darwin services, is looking at setting up its second Australian hub. Its base at present is in Melbourne. Mr Hobbs would not rule out Alice Springs getting more flights in the wake of the Darwin decision, which was based on the airports expensive fuel and landing costs. Jetstar will create a hub inDarwin and increase thenumber of flights to southeast Asia. But Alice Springs is still not on Jetstars radar. Airline spokeswoman Simone Pregellio said there were no immediate plans for the Red Centre. She said: From a group perspective, Qantas already services the area. ButMsPregellio did say it could be a long-term prospect and the new Darwin service would bring more international and domestic visitors into the Northern Territory. She said Darwin was perfectly positioned for Jetstars seven Top End-based aircraft to service Asian destinations. Nudists seek Centre sun From Page 1 Mr Grigg said: Hes been up here in the hot months and was amazed at the amount of sunshine there is. It would be an all year resort. When I said: What about January when it gets up to 45 degrees? he said, There were also spectacular sunsets and beautiful hills. Mr Grigg said the investor was looking for aproperty outside the radius of Alice Springs so that passers-by could not see in. He said clothing optional resorts were incredibly popular in Europe, and could mean big business for Alice Springs. Mr Grigg said: In Europe its accepted culture. There are specific walks and hikes for thismarket. Mayor Damien Ryan said he would support the idea if it were properly ex ecuted. He believed a resort would be suitable around Glen Helen, Aileron Homestead or Ross River. Mayor Ryan said: It wouldnt happen in Alice Springs, but any sort of investment is good for the town. The community would welcome it if it weredoneeffectively. Resorts already op erate in Australia, with well-known oper ations such as The White Cockatoo in North Queensland at tracting tourists in the warmer months for the past six years. Shirley is true bosom buddy Prosthetic fitter Shirley Fitzgerald with Bosom Buddies Wave Hayden and Lesley Reilly. Picture: PIETER NAESSENS BOSOM Buddies wants to bring bra and prosthetic fitter Shirley Fitzgerald to Alice Springs more often. This week the Order of Australia Medallist has been run off her feet fitting up to 100 people. She said: Its been busy. The women have been amazing, and for me its amazing to help them and share information. Ms Fitzgerald has been visiting Alice Springs twice a year since 2003. Bosom Buddies secretary Lesley Reilly said they hoped to increase that number. She said donations raised from the Tourism Central Australia Awards would help pay for more visits.