Territory Stories

The Centralian advocate Tue 1 Jul 2008

Details:

Title

The Centralian advocate Tue 1 Jul 2008

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2008-07-01

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.) -- Newspapers.; Australia, Central -- Newspapers

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Alice Springs

Volume

v. 62 no. 11

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00529

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/233411

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/657139

Page content

12 Centralian Advocate, Tuesday, July 1, 2008 P U B : C A D V D A T E : 1 -J U L -2 0 0 8 P A G E : 1 2 C O L O R : C M Y K MOTORING George says his job is a dream Daniel Burdon PLAYING under the bonnet of a V8 Supercar is a mechanics dream job for 28-year-old George Lia. He is a number two mechanic who works on the Holden supercar that Jason Richards will at Darwins Hidden Valley Raceway at the weekend. He said: Ive been with the team for four years first as a machinist, then number three mechanic and now as the number two. Jason is responsible for helping the number one mechanic get ready to roll at every race meet. But dream job or not, it has its pitfalls. George said: Often, well work late into the night, and theres always a tight schedule. He and the rest of the Holden/Fuchs lubricant-sponsored team usually take more than three months to build a mean machine. But George said: We did have to push one out very quickly early in the year, making the whole car from scratch in just 51 days. George has been working with the team since 2004. New-age fuel and hybrids are future for Holden ALTERNATIVE fuels and hybrid engines will form part of a multitechnology that will power future Commodores. Announcing the end of four cylinder engine manufacturing in Melbourne last week, Holden chair man and managing director Mark Reuss confirmed the V6 engine would get several fuel-saving technologies to keep it viable. Holden will add a turbodiesel Commodore to the line-up, directinjection engines and a petrolelectric hybrid. Reuss is reluctant to talk time-frames but the diesel is expected on our roads in two years. More interestingly, dedicated LPG and ethanol-fuelled Commodores are also expected to become more mainstream within three years. The companys V8 will get a cylinder deactivation system, which can shut down cylinders to save fuel. Reuss says a hybrid Commodore is definitely part of Holdens future, but insiders say it is still up to five years away. The company is expected to market diesel as a premium product, in line with European importers who sell diesel alongside their petrolengined luxury cars. Micks just mad about ute musters Mick Gallagher takes Matilda for a spin in the dirt. Picture: JUSTIN BRIERTY Chris OLeary IT was a case of going mad or getting a Ute muster, said Mick Gallagher. So Mick set about organising Apex Central Australian Ute Muster at the Alice Springs Show on Saturday. Up to 20 vehicles will be on display at Blatherskite Park. Mick has been itching to show off Matilda, his sticker-covered Ford XR6, since he moved to town three months ago. He said: Ive had withdrawal symptoms because when I was in Sydney they had ute musters every week. So I thought bugger that. We got Apex on board and got straight into organising it. Otherwise I would have gone mad. Mick and his mate Sammy Hart from the Red Rangers ute club say people love utes because they are so practical. . Sammy will have his white 1978 HZ Kingswood fitted with five spotlights and blue lights on the side skirts at the muster. He said: Utes are the giver of life, and musters are a chance to show off and find out what people think of your toy. What I love about utes is you can stop anywhere, pull the tailgate down, start a fire nearby and cook your tea for the night. I got mine when my dad told me not to when I was 17. Mick said: Really? So did I. The social side of it is great because they bring people in from the stations. The muster will have eight categories including town, tradesmen, and chick utes. Profits from the muster will be donated to Apex. To enter ring 0423 110 558 before Thursday.


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