Territory Stories

The Centralian advocate Tue 20 May 2008

Details:

Title

The Centralian advocate Tue 20 May 2008

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2008-05-20

Notes

Incorrectly numbered on first page as v. 61 no. 102; This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.) -- Newspapers.; Australia, Central -- Newspapers

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Alice Springs

Volume

v. 61 no. 103

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00266

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/233395

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/657345

Page content

States go to war QUEENSLAND stand on the verge of a new dynasty in State of Origin rugby league, a domination they have not experienced in almost two decades. Blues captain Danny Buderus Maroons captain Cameron Smith The Maroons claimed their first outright back-to-back series win since 1989 last year and enter the 2008 series aiming to equal the Origin record of three successive series triumphs. Only twice in Queensland (1982-84 and 1987-89) and twice in NSW history (1992-94 and 2003-2005) have Origin teams strung hat-tricks. Coached by Mal Meninga, the greatest pointscorer in Origin history, the Queensland side will start favourites for another series win despite losing skipper Darren Lockyer with a knee injury for at least the opening clash next Wednesday at ANZ Stadium. Without Lockyer, Queensland still has a hot backline with current Test stars such as fullback Billy Slater, winger Greg Inglis, centres Israel Folau and Justin Hodges and halfback Johnathan Thurston. Even winger Brent Tate and stand-in five-eighth Karmichael Hunt have pulled on the green on gold jumper for Australia. Almost every Origin series in recent history begins with the ideology that NSW have the forwards and Queensland the backs. In 2008, its different. Queensland have both. Every member of Queenslands starting side including Petero Civoniceva, Cameron Smith, Carl Webb, Michael Crocker, Sam Thaiday and Dallas Johnson has played for Australia. NSW have just three current Test players in their pack the backrow of Ryan Hoffman, Willie Mason and Paul Gallen while hooker Danny Buderus lost his Test jumper to Smith and props Ben Cross and Brett White have not gone close. It is Queenslands forwards Meninga says hold the key to sustained Maroon dominance. He said: Without the forwards doing their work, without their direct play up the middle, without being dominant and without getting good field position, they (the backline) may not get the opportunity to display their skills. Queenslands 13 Test stars narrowly shadows the 12 Kangaroos in the NSW side for Origin I, although the Blues have put three of them on the interchange bench in Anthony Tupou, Craig Fitzgibbon and Ben Hornby. NSW are fielding four Origin rookies halfback Peter Wallace, winger Anthony Quinn plus forwards Cross and Anthony Laffranchi while Queensland have just Folau and bench prop Ben Hannant making their Maroons debuts. Rookie NSW coach Craig Bellamy, the best NRL coach the past two years who was called in to replace Graham Murray after his twin series defeats, is not fazed by Queenslands stellar backline which contains three of his own Melbourne players. Bellamy said, if anything, the Maroons should fear his talentfilled Blues backline which includes Test stars Mark Gasnier and Greg Bird, plus former Kangaroos Brett Stewart, Jarryd Hayne and Matt Cooper. We think weve got plenty of talent in our backline so hopefully theyll be a little bit concerned about us. NSW fullback Stewart said the Blues know how important it is to avoid a hat-trick of defeats and given Origin I will be held in Sydney they must strike first and not be forced into trying to keep the series alive at Suncorp Stadium on June 11. Rudd kicks off public affairs show PRIME Minister Kevin Rudd will be the first guest on ABCs new interactive public affairs program, Q And A. Lateline presenter Tony Jones will host the hour-long program, with the Prime Minister taking questions from the studio audience, as well as from viewers online and via text (sms). Jones said Q And A would provide a chance for the PM to face the people six months after he was elected to office. He encouraged viewers to fire in questions for the PM via the Q And A website www.abc.net.au/tv/ qanda Mr Jones said: Q And A will provide a unique opportunity for Australians everywhere to ask the Prime Minister questions they believe are vitally important to them. He said Q And A was an experiment in public democracy: Its going to be live, unpredictable and lots of fun. Following the Prime Ministers inaugural appearance, the programs format from episode two onwards will revolve around five different panellists each week facing questions on a range of topical issues from the studio audience and viewers. Jones will be the ringmaster keeping the studio audience in line and keeping the five different panellists focused on the subjects up for discussion. The panellists each week will generally include politicians from both sides of politics and three well-known but very different personalities who represent a cross-section of society. Tony Jones will continue to present Lateline twice a week. Q and A will be shown on ABC at 9.35pm Theroux show investigates notorious San Quentin jail LOUIS Theroux investigates San Quentin on Monday night on Seven Central at 10.30pm. Death Row, condemned inmates housing, San Quentin. San Quentin is the most notorious maximum security prison in California and the only one with a death row. Once home to serial murderer Charles Manson, San Quentin continues to bang up, and execute, the most dangerous criminals. Fear of crime is an all pervading theme in the USA. People sleep with guns under their pillows, petrified that they will be the next victims of the murderers they see daily on their TVs. California has responded to this climate with a firm hand and as a result most state prisons hold more than twice the capacity they were built for, forcing prisoners to triplebunk in open warehousesized gymnasiums. San Quentin is no exception. In this 6000-strong prison full of serial murderers, rapists, paedophiles and gang members Theroux spends time getting to know the inmates and prison guards and becomes part of the day to day of prison life. Can he see beyond the crime when he meets an inmate? Can prisoners change and better themselves or is this wishful thinking? The guards say that its not easy to rehabilitate prisoners in prison; that the best they can do is keep the peace, and even that is difficult sometimes. The gang culture is too strong, the loneliness too much to handle, and the drugs too tempting. They say that they have seen inmates back in prison sometimes as little as three hours after theyve been released. During his time behind bars, Theroux joins the guards for cell shake downs where ingenious and terrifying deadly weapons are found. He spends time with an inmate and his family during visitation period when drugs and weapons are regularly smuggled in. Theroux witnesses the arrival of a fresh new inmate, a child who has never been in prison before. He sees him taken through the arrivals procedure with 300 other bodies that have arrived that day. Has he lived a life of crime until now and prison is the rite of passage he has been waiting for or was it a mistake and all he wants now is to stay straight and get out quickly. Theroux walks the yard getting to know members of notorious gangs and learns how gang segregation lines are not to be crossed.


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