Territory Stories

The Centralian advocate Fri 3 Mar 2006

Details:

Title

The Centralian advocate Fri 3 Mar 2006

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2006-03-03

Notes

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers; Northern Territory; Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.); Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.); Australia, Central

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Alice Springs

Volume

v. 59 no. 82

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00850

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/233011

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/659580

Page content

Pine Gap protest: Blazes keep firies busy man .accuses cop BY LEE STEHBENS FIREFIGHERS i'n Alice Springs had a busy weekend having to attend to three car fires and four grass fires By REBECCA FALCONER A MAN charged over protesting outside Pine Gap spy base has accused, a senior federal policeman of giving false evidence in court. Sean Christopher O'Reilly yesterday defended himself in the Alice Springs Magistrates Court against the charge of obstructing a Commonwealth official. He told the court a senior Australian Protective Services officer had embellished his story about the Christian activist's arrest at the USAustralian joint defence facility early on December 9 last year. Commonwealth prosecutor Paul Usher said in the summary hearing that Pine Gap was in lock-down after other protesters climbed on to the building's roof when O'Reilly and fellow ac~ivist Jessica Morrison drove up to the gate. . . . . APS senior officer David Thomas Parker told the court he and APS officer Veronica Maas approached the pair because they were illegally on Pine Gap's grounds. He said: "They were holding a banner up and filming through the gate into the facility." Sen officer Parker said he warned O'Reilly eight to 10 . times he would arrest him under section 14 of a police Act if he continued to obstruct him a~ he searched th,e van which was believed to be involved in the earlier break-in. He said O'Reilly continuously badgered him. Officer Maas gave evidence that O'Reilly was agitated and invaded her colleague's space. She said she heard him mentioning the police Act three to five times before before sen officer Parker arrested him. But O'Reilly denied sen officer Parker had mentioned any Ac;:t, calling that evidence false. He pointed to varying evidence. NT police Constables Darren Kirk and Mark Lyons, who were guarding a paddy wagon with other protesters in the back, suggested the episode lasted five to 10 minutes. Constable Lyons said he was unable to hear the conversation, but the exchange between O'Reilly and sen officer Parker seemed amicable. O'Reilly said: "Officer Parker said it took 15, maybe 20 minutes. In his notes, I was arrested at 6.40. Officer Maas said 6.18." Fire station commander John Kleeman said there had been an increase in car fires over the past few months. He said it usually involved abandoned cars or as a result of arguments in town camps. Firefighers had to attend a car fire at Little Sisters Camp on Saturday about 2pm. There was also a car fire 20km north of Alice Spring near the James Orr Overpass about. 1.50am Sunday. Two of the grass fires were in the Todd River, there was one at the Tom Brown roundabout near the Gap and another near the turnoff to the Telegraph Station on the north Stuart Highway. Officer Maas sat nearby with Ms Morrison. Magistrate Melanie Little is due to give her decision today. Pictures taken at the Pine Gap protest have been banned from publication. Mr Kleeman said fuel loads around the Alice Springs area were still pretty sparse. Employment Access Shop 1 Leichtodd Plaza 7 Leichhardt Terrace . 8953 0911 Want a Job? Got a disability? Come andsee us. ) c The Employment Access team, comprising Tony McKenzie, Kathleen Sheehan, Clare Fuller and Roger Thompson, can help disabled people into full or part-time jobs. Disabled can do it THE benefits of employing a person with a disability include better than average reliability, lower than average maintenance costs and a positive effect on organisational performance. Employment Access has been helping people with a disability find a job for the past 10 years. The Employment Access team co-manager Roger count of how many people Employment Access has placed in part-time and full-time jobs. She said: "There is more to it than just placing people in a job. "We get to know the person first and then we find a job to suit that person and that fits their abilities." Interviews Thompson, co-manager Clare Employment Access can assist Fuller, administration assistant people seeking jobs with helping Kathleen Sheehan and job co- job seekers in preparing ordinator Tony McKenzie - can resumes, interviews and finding help people in all job-seeking jobs. areas. It can negotiate with employIt aims tomatch its clients to a ers, offering support to both job so that the employer gets the employer and employee on and best person for the job. off the job for as long as it is Clare Fuller said she has lost' required. Employment Access offers free recruitment for employers and can offer free-on-the-job training for clients. It also offers support for em-. ployer's staff to help them understand issues that arise in working with people who have a disability. The Alice Springs based specialist employment business helps people with a disability find a job in a variety of ways, which ensures the client has input in the process. For more information phone Employment Access on 89530911 or visit the office at Shop 1 Leichtodd Plaza, 7 Leichh; .. rtt, Terrace, Alice Springs. The office is generally open from 8.30am until 4.30pm. Centralian Advocate, Friday, March 3,2005 -15


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