Territory Stories

Northern Territory seabird breeding colony monitoring

Details:

Title

Northern Territory seabird breeding colony monitoring

Creator

Mahney, Terry; McKay, Lindley; Ziembicki, Mark; Westaway, John; Brennan, Kym; Morrison, Scott; Northern Territory. Department of Natural Resources, Environment, the Arts and Sport Biodiversity Conservation Division

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT

Date

2009

Notes

Date:2009; Cover title. Includes bibliographical references.; Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT)

Language

English

Subject

Biodiversity conservation -- Northern Territory; Birds -- Breeding -- Australia, Northern; Wildlife conservation -- Northern Territory

Publisher name

Northern Territory Government

Place of publication

Palmerston

Format

20 pages : ill., map ; 30 cm.

File type

application/pdf

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Northern Territory Government

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/231879

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/665867

Page content

North Peron Island North Peron Island is located 110km south west of Darwin. It is 4km from the mainland and is 1900 ha in size. Australasian Pelicans nest on the sandy peninsula on the north end of the island. It is the only island-based pelican nesting site in the Northern Territory with an average of over 2000 birds breeding here each year. It is considered to be of national significance because it is one of the largest known regular breeding sites for this species in the world. Unlike inland breeding colonies such as Lake Eyre, birds are able to breed here regularly year after year and are not subject to the opportunistic breeding associated with flood events (Chatto 2000). Photo: Young pelicans on North Peron Island (photo L. McKay) A visit was made to the island with the local Bulgul Rangers, traditional owners and Parks and Wildlife Rangers from Litchfield National Park on the 29th and 30th June 2009. The traditional owners and rangers were interested in monitoring and managing the breeding colony because they are concerned about the threats posed by fisherman and fire. They reported instances where fisherman have smashed nests and killed young birds. They also reported fires wiping out the breeding colony. This concurs with Chatto 2000, who reports that in 1992 the area was burnt out and no birds were recorded nesting.