Territory Stories

Alice Springs town basin, review 2003

Details:

Title

Alice Springs town basin, review 2003

Creator

Read, R. E.

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT; Report ; no. 42/2003

Date

2003-12-01

Description

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Notes

Date:2003-12

Language

English

Publisher name

Department of Infrastructure, Planning and Environment

Place of publication

Alice Springs

Series

Report ; no. 42/2003

File type

application/pdf.

Copyright owner

Check within Publication or with content Publisher.

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/229443

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/672980

Page content

Table 5 continued Site Report Title Consultant Date Railway Yards Human Health and Environmental Risk Assessment URS Australia April 1998 Railway Yards Groundwater Monitoring Event URS Australia September 1999 Railway Yards Report for a Groundwater Monitoring Event URS Australia September 1999 Railway Yards Recalibration of the Alice Springs Railyard Contaminant Fate and Transport Model URS Australia December 2000 Railway Yards Groundwater Monitoring Event URS Australia April 2001 Shell Todd Preliminary Investigation and Environmental Site Assessment Report IT Environmental December 2001 Shell Todd Phase 2 Environmental Site Assessment by IT Environmental IT Environmental April 2002 Shell Todd Phase 3 Environmental Site Assessment by IT Environmental IT Environmental April 2002 Shell Todd Update Soil Validation Report IT Environmental August 2002 Shell Todd Soil Validation Report IT Environmental September 2002 Shell Todd Post Remediation Environmental Site Assessment IT Environmental November 2002 Shell Todd Groundwater Monitoring Report IT Environmental April 2003 5.2 Aquifers 5.2.1 Alluvial aquifers These were described by Quinlan and Woolley (1969), who identified five aquifers. These were named the wedge, 1810, 1820, 1830, 1840 and 1850 aquifers for their elevation in feet. The following description is summarised from Quinlan and Woolley (1969), and would have been based on examination of samples from many cable-tool drilled bores. The fluviatile sediments consist of a mixture of gravel, sand, silt, and clay, and can be divided into four main lithological types: 1. Brown sand. 2. Brown and grey clayey sand 3. Brown and grey silt and clay 4. Regolith and colluvium Brown sand: This has a wide range in grainsize. Quartz is predominant, but some of the beds contain sufficient feldspar grains to warrant the use of the term arkose. Fragments of gneiss and schist, and aggregates of quartz, are common; they range from sand to boulder size. The silt fraction consists mainly of quartz and mica. The sieve analyses of samples from any one bore may show differences in the degree of 14


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