Territory Stories

Arafura swamp water resources study

Details:

Title

Arafura swamp water resources study

Creator

Williams, D.; Chudleigh, I.; Jolly, P.

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT; Report ; 45/2003

Date

2003

Description

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Notes

Date:2003

Language

English

Publisher name

Dept. of Infrastructure, Planning and Environment

Place of publication

Darwin

Series

Report ; 45/2003

File type

application/pdf.

Copyright owner

Check within Publication or with content Publisher.

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/229247

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/673198

Page content

19 The Glyde River Estuary The Glyde River estuary drains the Arafura Swamp into Castlereagh Bay, and then into the Arafura Sea. The estuary is 35km long and meanders over a width of 17km. The mouth of the estuary has a width of around 700 metres and this gradually becomes narrower until it is only a boat width in the upper parts of the estuary. The estuary is tidal except during floods. During the dry season 4 metre tides can be experienced at the mouth of the Glyde River estuary. At this time the flow within the Glyde is confined to the channels. During floods the estuary is fluvial dominated by strong flood inflows. Wet season flows often cover the coastal plain with freshwater. The coastal plain has a width of approximately 17km (refer to Figure 16 and 17). Figure 16: Satellite image of the Glyde River Estuary The eastern side of the coastal plain has some spring-fed rainforest patches (refer to Figure 18) and the western side of the floodplain supports some water holes. Gupulul Creek and some other small streams flow from the coastal plain into the estuary.


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