Territory Stories

Renison Goldfields Consolidated Limited, Pine Creek Project. Groundwater Investigation Stage 2, Establishment of Borefield and Management Studies. Report H114/3-AA.

Details:

Title

Renison Goldfields Consolidated Limited, Pine Creek Project. Groundwater Investigation Stage 2, Establishment of Borefield and Management Studies. Report H114/3-AA.

Creator

Coffey & Partners Pty Ltd

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT; Report no. 87/1984

Date

1983-11-01

Notes

Date:1983-11

Language

English

Publisher name

Northern Territory Government

Place of publication

Darwin

Series

Report no. 87/1984

File type

application/pdf

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Northern Territory Government

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/228435

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/674167

Page content

Technical Report WRD84087 Viewed at 14:07:14 on 29/07/2010 Page 80 of 167. I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I H1l4/1-MRS Nov 26, 1983. 49. 8.1 8.2 Effects of Groundwater Extraction Apart [rom the town borefield, which has already been discussed r the on 1 y othe:::- -groundw<J ter development is at. Kybrook Farms located s()uth of the minesite within AREA 2. [~'1br00k F;;rms is an abor igina 1 comrrmnity involved in small Be'lie clgr leul ture on a partly devell 'ped 80 hectare property. 'rhe farm obtains Wdte=r for irrigation from "!roW10vitlter b-ei"leath the si Le, 2.1 though total annual extraction rates are very lo'..!. The effects of l~IH"'ping on tile Kybrook water supply will depend t~~-, a L~rqe extent un the proximity of mine production bores to the Fc1rm '.upply. Experience in the Town area has sho\<ffi that bt)re Sp-(.!'Cil~gS of 500 to 600 metres are required to avoid severe interference effects which nkl.y cause decline in perfo:::-m<J.nce. Under current r1,:!.nni:lg production bore sites will be spaced to minimize interference and ensu~e continuity of supply is m,lint'1~;1ed. No bores would be sited within the farm boundaries c.1nd uny loss of supply would. be made good by the mining comp..=u'ly. ?~epaqe from TRil ings ur.d Overburden Dll..i."TIDS DuriT1q the life or t.he mining operGtion t:!1e prucess Wi"lter r(.'~erv0ir ,1nd t.dilirlg disposdl are.:.lS wU 1 act :J..S Q contiIlu,d sllurcc of bQLh SCCpd.gC w-.a.tcr ond dissulved solids int::::-oduced W~Ut the L:lilings. In udditio:1, and pe:~ .. hups more import.a:nt:..l ., ure..1kdown ,;.nd leaching of sulphides from, the waste rock dum?".;:; may potentJ..~111y create acidic seepage wate:r- char<3.cterized by 10w pH ,"'lonG high sulphu tes. L()~.oJ pH w.J.ters in turn CiJ.n incre,J,se the mubility of selected heavy meta.ls. InfiltriJ.tion of s8cpilge WiJt 'r- will cause a local rise in welter levels in the vicinity of the disposal Elt:"P(l whi CIt in turn will cause development. of a shallow g!'oundW'a.te~ mound. Figure 24 shows the probable grou."1dwater potential distribution and flow confi~uration resulting from seepage. White no site testing has been carried out to determine seepaqe or leakage losses, a figure of 5 rn 3 /day/ha has been estimated in preparing a water balance for the process water system. Total seepage losses are estimated to amount to 24 Ml/year (0.75 l/sec) - see section 2. 8.2.1 Seepage and Dispersion -: --,~ F j '1'ure 25 shows the Ij I ely dix-ection of movement of seepage water away from the site.