Territory Stories

Top paddock newsletter

Details:

Title

Top paddock newsletter

Creator

Northern Territory. Department of Resources

Collection

Top Paddock Newsletter; Top Paddock Newsletter; E-Journals; PublicationNT

Date

2010-10-01

Location

Berrimah

Notes

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).; This publication contains many links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Agriculture; Northern Territory; Periodicals

Publisher name

Northern Territory Government

Place of publication

Berrimah

Volume

Issue 44

File type

application/pdf

ISSN

1320-727X

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Northern Territory Government

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/227444

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/675604

Page content

3 The 15th Australia-Indonesia Working Group on Agriculture, Food and Forestry Cooperation (WGAFFC) by Scott Wauchope, Director Pastoral Production Division The 15th Australia-Indonesia Working Group on Agriculture, Food and Forestry Cooperation (WGAFFC) meeting was held in Darwin from 31 May to 3 June. These meetings alternate between Australia and Indonesia each year. WGAFFCs purpose is to maximise opportunities and strengthen cooperation between the two countries. The department contributed to the event by arranging a field trip which included tours of Berrimah Farm, Beatrice Hill and the Coastal Plains research facilities. Delegates heard about the important work being undertaken by the department. At Berrimah, Lorna Melville led the tour of the Veterinary Laboratories and gave an interesting presentation on the Territorys perspective of the national monitoring program of Sentinel herds for monitoring of arboviruses. Horticulturalist Mark Hoult presented the ACIAR Integrated passionfruit production systems project which aims to overcome disease issues in both countries, including a root rot and bacterial disease as well as extending information on pollination and other cultural practices. Andrew Daly reviewed another ACIAR project in Eastern Indonesia and Northern Australia on mango and rambutan quality and supply chain systems, which is particularly improving the quality of life for farmers in Lombok. Beatrice Hill presentations began with Arthur Cameron examining Tropical Pastures on both upland and floodplain land which illustrated how stocking capacity can be increased through improved pastures Barry Lemcke spoke about Australian Buffalo which covered their history and outlined DoRs work on the iverine breeding program and the meat and dairy industry development as well as the Tender buff program. He also highlighted the departments work on the composite cattle breeding program for local and SE Asia markets. At the Coastal Plains farm tour, delegates viewed the departments tropical fruit collection. Oil palm is a huge industry in Indonesia and although the departments research has yet to provide any results, delegates were interested in hearing about our plantings. Don Reilly gave an informative presentation on African mahogany and genetically improved trees, which are being bred for high quality timber production in the semi-arid tropics. Stuart Smith examined biofuel plants (pongamia mainly) and discussed the potential for the production of biofuel in the Territory. Finally, the field trip ended at the Windows on the Wetland where participants heard an interesting talk about the history of agriculture in the wetlands. Certainly the day was enjoyed by all who attended and the department was thanked for organising the event. Thanks to all who participated in making the day a success. Barry Lemcke Buffalo Presentation Forestry at CPRS Arthur Cameron introducing Top End Pastures


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