Territory Stories

Technical annual report 2000-01

Details:

Title

Technical annual report 2000-01

Collection

Dept. of Regional Development, Primary Industry, Fisheries and Resources technical annual report; Department of Regional Development, Primary Industry, Fisheries and Resources technical and annual report; Reports; PublicationNT; Technical bulletin (Northern Territory. Dept. of Primary Industry and Fisheries) ; no. 295

Date

2001-10

Description

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Notes

Date:2001-10

Language

English

Subject

Agriculture -- Northern Territory -- Periodicals; Fisheries -- Northern Territory -- Periodicals

Publisher name

Dept. of Primary Industry and Fisheries

Place of publication

Darwin

Series

Technical bulletin (Northern Territory. Dept. of Primary Industry and Fisheries) ; no. 295

ISSN

0158-2763

Copyright owner

Check within Publication or with content Publisher.

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/223369

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/687151

Page content

Department of Primary Industry and Fisheries 88 PROJECT: Monitoring and Eradication of Cattle Tick Strains Resistant to Chemicals Project Officers: K. Small, D. Russell and I. Doddrell Location: NT Wide There are two parts to the project on monitoring for and eradication of strains of cattle tick resistant to chemicals. They are described separately below. Objective: Locate chemically resistant strains of cattle tick on NT properties and prevent their spread. Advise industry on chemical control of any detected resistant cattle tick strains. Prior to April 1999 there were no known cattle tick strains resistant to synthetic pyrethroids or amitraz in the NT. Previously some resistant strains to organic phosphates were detected during the 1970s and 1980s. Organic phosphates were banned as an acaricide in 1987. There are strains of cattle ticks resistant to one or more acaricides in Queensland. All cattle from the tickinfected areas of Queensland require a clean inspection followed by plunge dip to enter the NT. Despite this control, there is a low level of activity to monitor for resistant ticks as there may be illegal movements or inspectors in Queensland may not detect ticks. Although there is little cattle tick control in the NT to improve production, the entry of resistant ticks would have a significant effect on achieving tick free cattle for export overseas and interstate. Fully engorged female cattle ticks are collected in the field and sent to the Animal Research Institute, QDPI for processing and larval packet testing against a number of tickicides. Collectors and station owners/managers are given the results and appropriately advised. The program targets properties that report poor tick kill and properties on which pour-on synthetic pyrethroids are used for cattle tick or buffalo fly control. Parkhurst resistant ticks (resistant to synthetic pyrethroids and organophosphates e.g. Bayticol, Barricade 'S' and Blockade-S) were found on two properties in the Mary River area in April 1999. Monitoring activity commenced in the Mary River area on the properties with known Parkhurst resistant cattle ticks and the neighbouring properties. Any reports of poor tick kill following treatment are investigated. Parkhurst resistant cattle ticks were found on a third property during 2000. In 2001 a further two properties were found to have Parkhurst resistant ticks. Eradication Objectives: Eradicate Parkhurst strain resistant ticks from the NT. Prevent the spread of resistant strains of tick by advising industry on chemical control and implementing effective movement controls. Parkhurst strain resistant ticks (resistant to synthetic pyrethroids and organophosphates e.g. Bayticol, Barricade S and Blockade-S) are found on five properties in the Darwin area. A program commenced in 1999 to control the spread of Parkhurst ticks and to survey other properties for the presence of Parkhurst ticks. A $200,000 program has commenced to eradicate ticks on the infected properties. This involves the supply of Acatak and Amitraz to achieve total tick eradication. Treatment will be carried out over two years, followed by a two-year period of monitoring for freedom from ticks. Controls are in place, which allow the movement of agistment stock to and from affected properties. The eradication program involves clean paddock musters, total herd treatment, removal of unmusterable stock