Territory Stories

The Northern Territory news Tue 20 Jul 2010

Details:

Title

The Northern Territory news Tue 20 Jul 2010

Other title

NT news

Collection

The Northern Territory news; NewspaperNT

Date

2010-07-20

Description

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/222288

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/691607

Page content

10 NT NEWS. Tuesday, July 20, 2010. www.ntnews.com.au P U B : N T N E W S D A T E : 2 0 -J U L -2 0 1 0 P A G E : 1 0 C O L O R : C M Y K Pack a punch Fitness with KELLAM KRELLE BOXING is one of the most popular fitness regimens and, if its a lean, toned, strong body youre after, it could be for you. Some of the benefits are: weight loss, increased agility, coordination and muscle tone, and greater cardio endurance. Many people think its all about the arms, but its actually a cardio workout for the whole body. Its especially good for toning gluteus and quadriceps muscles, so perfect for women who want to tighten up bottom and thighs. Theresnoneedtoworry aboutbulkinguplikeMike Tyson. Boxing is high repetition, so youll see tone rather than muscle size. If you want tone and muscle, split your program with weight training. Weak wrists may be a problem, but once you learn how to box properly so you wont put unnecessary strain on them. The aim of your punches is also important.Alignthemcorrectly and your knuckles wont feel any pain. You can wrap knuckles and wrists with support tape. Punching may feel easy when its one jab at a time, but after 100 consecutive punches, 50 push-ups, 50 sit-ups and 20 burpees, youll soon feel the pain. Workout of the week: High-intensity circuit Rnd 1: 1min, Rnd 2: 100reps, Rnd 3: 1min, Rnd 4: 100reps (no rest). Station 1: Power jabs; Station 2: Flutters; Station 3: Push-ups; Station 4: 40kg Alternate lunges; Station 5: Side kicks; Station 6: 8kg med ball sit-ups; Station 7: Hooks; Station 8: Hover; Station 9: Uppercuts; Station 10: 6 cone shuttle run (15m Spacing). Note: Always warm-up and cool down. Kellam Krelle is a personal trainer of Pumped Fitness. 0418 627 183, kellam@pumpedfitness.com.au, www.pumpedfitness.com.au EXERCISE Take time to stretch out By ALEXIA ELEJALDE-RUIZ in Chicago Stretching is important to keep your body fighting fit, but make sure you do it the right way to avoid injury EVEN a dancer can experience a time when she cant touch her toes. Thats when you know your days of doing the splits are long gone. Blame the day you swapped ballet shoes for running shoes. Blame age. Blame the hours you spend sitting in a chair hunched over a keyboard. But mostly, blame the fact you dont stretch enough, or that you do it incorrectly. Usually when people are stretching, something is bent; the leg is bent, the back is rounded, says Donna Flagg, a dancer and instructor with the Joffrey Ballet School in New York. But bent is not stretched. In ballet, everything is about opposition youre pulling one point away from another, like stretching a rubber band, says Flagg, who has developed a ballet-inspired stretching class called Lastics. Thats why dancers bodies are long and lean, and theyre the most flexible beings in the business. When people try to show how high they can kick their leg or how close they can get their nose to their knee, it de feats the purpose, Flagg says. Its about maintaining the form, which may mean not going as far, Flagg says. And dont think that because youre touching your toe or have your knee to your face that youre stretched. You want length. To help get your body bending again, here are some favourite ballet stretches. STRETCH 1 For hamstrings How to do it: Kneel on one knee and put your other leg in front of you, keeping that leg straight and your hips square and facing forward. Flex your front foot. If youre tight, stay upright. If you can, lean forward, keeping your back and knee straight, and put your hands to the floor. If you still have more stretch in you, grab your foot and pull it toward you, keeping your back and knee straight. Repeat with the other leg. STRETCH 2 For the chest How to do it: Stand next to a barre or something you can hold on to, raise one arm up, lift your torso and arch backward. Your legs and butt should be tight, and pull in your abdominals to maintain strength and control. STRETCH 3 For hips, quadriceps, spine How to do it: Get down on one knee and bend your other leg so its in front of you at a 90-degree angle, making sure that front knee is directly above your heel. Tuck in your rear and push your hips forward, keeping your hips square and that front knee over your heel, so you can feel the stretch in your hip and the front of your thigh. For a deeper quadricep stretch, grab your back foot and bring it toward your butt. If you can, twist your body toward your back leg to stretch your spine. Repeat on the other side. STRETCH 4 For hamstring, lower back How to do it: Raise your leg to the front and put your foot on a barre, with your leg turned out. Keep your hips down and square, so aim for a lower level if you find your hip lifting. If you lift one hip, youre allowing the muscle to slacken and not getting a full stretch. Flex your foot. If you can, lean your upper body toward your leg (with back straight and hips down) to stretch your lower back. GO FITNESS HEALTH RECIPES LIFESTYLE with Nadja Hainke go@ntnews.com.au Bathtubblues SYDNEY:Bathroomsarethe muckiestpartofAustralian homes,withfouroutoffivecontaminatedwith bacteriaandtwothirdsclassedasunhygienic,a newreportsays.Evenmoreconcerningisthefact thebacteriafoundingrottybathroomscantrigger potentiallyserious illnessessuchasflu, the HygieneCouncil says.Therubberorsiliconebit betweenbathtubsandthewallarethefilthiestbit. Content countryGPs SYDNEY:Australias ruraldoctors feel justasprofessionallysatisfied astheircity-basedpeers,andare happierabouttheirpay.Amajor studyofabout4000doctorsalsofoundtheywere equallyhappyabouttheirworkingconditions.The findingsshowhowthebadpressaboutruralpostings isunfounded,saidDrMatthewMcGrail fromtheSchool ofRuralHealthatMonashUniversity. Cheeringchoc WASHINGTON:Peoplewith depressioneatmorechocolate andtheamount increaseswith theseverityoftheir illness,anewstudyhasfound. Ourstudyconfirmslong-heldsuspicionsthateating chocolate issomethingpeopledowhentheyare feelingdown, saidDrBeatriceGolombofthe UniversityofCaliforniaatSanDiego,aco-authorofthe studyappearing intheArchivesof InternalMedicine. TREATMENT Teaspoon risk PARENTS are being warned not to give their children medicine using an ordinary teaspoon because of the risk of overdose. A study of teaspoons in common use in homes shows they vary in capacity from 2.5ml up to 7.3ml. It concluded parents should instead use the special spoon provided with a medicine or buy a syringe or spoon with measurements to ensure children received correct dosages. Our research clearly shows that using domestic teaspoons and tablespoons can result in children receiving considerably more or less medicine than they need, said Professor Matthew Falagas, director of the Alfa Institute of Biomedical Sciences in Athens. Paediatric dosages also needed to be adjusted for body weight as well as age, he said, making children more vulnerable to dosage errors than adults. MENTAL HEALTH A poll shows that Australias women are stressed out Picture: Picture: GETTY IMAGES Womenmore tense SYDNEY: Australias women are more stressed than the nations male population. A poll has found overall that 46 per cent of women and 41 per cent of men report feeling very stressed in their everyday lives. At the other end of the scale, the Newspoll commissioned by Lifeline found only 9 per cent of women and 11 per cent of men could report feeling no stress. Lifeline chief executive Dawn ONeil said the figures were not surprising as twice as many women also called Lifelines support hotlines than men. Our research indicates that in just about every aspect of life women are experiencing higher levels of stress, Ms ONeil said. This isnt to say that men are not stressed, in fact stress is a major issue for our whole community. Thepollasked1200menand women to rate stress levels across five key life areas.


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