Territory Stories

The Northern Territory news Tue 5 Jan 2010

Details:

Title

The Northern Territory news Tue 5 Jan 2010

Other title

NT news

Collection

The Northern Territory news; NewspaperNT

Date

2010-01-05

Description

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/216196

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/710265

Page content

www.ntnews.com.au Northern Territory News, Tuesday, January 5, 2010 3 P U B : NTNE-WS-DA-TE:5-JAGE:3 CO-LO-R: C-M Y-K NEWS Chook pecks Robbie HEMIGHT be the talk of the town, but British pop superstar RobbieWilliams is unlikely to get top billing on show night at the DalyWaters Pub. Williams is rumoured to have bought a property near the tiny Territory town, 600km south of Darwin. The famousDalyWaters Pub announced on its Facebook page that it was fine for the superstar to buy property in town, but the pubwould stick to its own headline star, Frank the ChookMan for local gigs. Full story in Out the Back: P11 More bang for your buck TWObank robbers who blew themselves up trying tomake a sizeable withdrawal from anATMhave been declared the 2009winners of the Darwin Awards. Organisers say the annual prize is given to those doing themost to improve the human gene pool ... by removing themselves from it. This year the dubious first placewent to the pair of bungling thieves in Belgium whowildly overestimated the amount of dynamite they needed to rob a bank. They bothwere killed when the blast demolished the entire building the ATM was housed in. Cops ponder charging lost bushies after pig escapade ByNIGELADLAM EXCLUSIVE POLICE may start charging for rescuing Territorians lost in the bush. Superintendent Chris Evans said rescue operations were expensive. We dont charge lost people now but its something we may have to look into, he said. Supt Evans, of the police Territory Support Division, was speaking after police spent many thousands of dollars saving two pig shooters who spent a miserable wet and windy night lost near Berry Springs, 50km south of Darwin. Police had to hire a helicopter for several hours and deploy officers all night to find the men. The pig shooters were last night too embarrassed to talk about their ordeal after being winched to safety and checked out at Royal Darwin Hospital. One Berry Springs businesswoman said: They couldnt be locals, otherwise they wouldnt have got lost around here. The men, both in their late thirties, went pig shooting early Sunday with no food or navigation equipment. They decided to go home about 10am but couldnt find their car. At 5pm, one of the shooters called his wife from his mobile telephone to say he and his mate were hopelessly lost and police mounted a rescue operation. Officers found the car but their vehicle then became bogged. Territory Response Section officers took over the search on foot. The men, in contact with police by phone until the battery went flat, followed instructions and lit a fire. They were spotted from a helicopter and a GPS reading was taken. Police found them about 4am after walking through bush in heavy rain for 8km. It was quite a slog through the night, Supt Evans said. All the men were winched into the chopper at 8am. The pig shooters were allowed home after the medical checks. Police said people should be prepared properly before going into the bush. They said navigation equipment should be carried and someone told where you are going and when you expect to be back. Students shine at graduation THE Northern Territory Open Education Centre is the one that got away. It missed out on appearing in the well-received NT News Formals supplement. The students held their graduation party at the Quality Frontier Hotel Darwin on November 20. Turn to our centre spread on pages 18 and 23 for the NT Open Education Centre class of 2009. Sailor comes to rescue at airport ByNIGELADLAM A TERRITORY sailors Christmas holiday got off to a dramatic start helping save the life of a woman who collapsed at an airport. Able seaman Tracey Moore, 32, gave the 56-yearold woman mouth-to-mouth until an ambulance arrived. Cherie Day, whose heart stopped twice during the ordeal, asked the Territorian and others who saved her life to visit her in hospital. It was an overwhelming moment, Ms Moore said. Very emotional. She called us her angels and thanked us for keeping her alive. Ms Day told the Northern Territory News that she would be grateful forever for those who saved her from dying on the floor of Melbourne airport after she suffered a heart attack at the luggage carousel last Wednesday. Apparently, Tracey was first at the scene and was marvellous, she said from her hospital bed. I was gone, not to be revived, or so it seemed. I was extraordinarily lucky. Ms Moore, who learnt first aid when joining the Navy eight years ago, had arrived in Melbourne to visit family when Ms Day collapsed a few metres away. I heard some one yelling, Has anybody got medical training? and ran over to help. The lady wasnt breathing, her heart had stopped. I gave her mouth to mouth while another woman carried out chest compressions. After a minute, we got her breathing and rolled her into the recovery position. But she stopped breathing again, so we rolled her back. A man grabbed a public use defibrillator and gave Ms Day three shocks but she still didnt start breathing. An airport ambulance then arrived and the crew managed to restart her heart. Surgeons at Royal Melbourne later unblocked a major heart vessel. Ms Moore is deployed on the Navys Darwin-based patrol boats. She has three daughters and has been in NT for nearly a year. HEARTFELTTHANKS:Cherie Daymeets her saviour, Tracey Moore fromDarwin, at the Royal Melbourne hospital yesterday. Picture: JOECASTRO Beating the blues A DARWIN psychologist has offered some timely advice for how to beat the January Blues. Senior Lecturer in Psychology at Charles Darwin University Peter Forster said people often set themselves for disappointment by having too high expectations of the holiday period. Read Dr Forsters tips in Go, P10 Beating the blues Pervert tries to lure boy A MAN tried to lure a young boy to his car in Alice Springs, police say. The boy became frightened and ran home and told his parents. His concerned mother reported it to police. A search of the area failed to a find a man fitting the suspects description. He was driving a white utility when he stopped and called the boy over to him. The incident happened in the Gap area in Alice Springs about 6pm on Wednesday. It comes just a week after a nine-year-old girl was followed while walking her dog. The girl told police she was walking through the Hillside Gardens area on the Golf Course Estate when she noticed a man in a small goldcoloured car following her on Tuesday, December 22. Police are not sure if the incidents are related. But Alice Springs watch commander Jody Nobbs said it was a timely reminder. It is important that you sit down with your children and teach them the four Rs recognise the danger, refuse any offer, run away and report it to the first person they feel safe with, she said. The man in the first incide n t i s d e s c r i b e d a s Caucasian, about 186cm tall with dark hair. In the latest incident the man has been described as Caucasian. REBEKAH CAVANAGH


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