Territory Stories

The Northern Territory news Sat 12 Dec 2009

Details:

Title

The Northern Territory news Sat 12 Dec 2009

Other title

NT news

Collection

The Northern Territory news; NewspaperNT

Date

2009-12-12

Description

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin

Publisher name

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

Nationwide News Pty. Limited

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/215569

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/711569

Page content

42 Northern Territory News, Saturday, December 12, 2009 www.ntnews.com.au P U B : N T N E W S D A T E : 1 2 -D E C -2 0 0 9 P A G E : 4 2 C O L O R : C M Y K DECEMBER 12, 2009 Territorians still have ball EVERYBODY loves a hero it gives ussomeone to look up to. But unlike everybody else, Territorians like their heroes to be like themselves: a tad different. And thats why a girl who invented a silly story about seeing a murder was treated so graciously when she helped host the Hookers Ball in Darwin. Chk Chk Boom girl Clare Werbeloff was forgiven for using a racist term while recounting her murder story to a TV news crew, showing that the best thing about the Territory is still that youre forgiven your sins sometimes even before youve committed them. Clare turned up to the ball in a skimpy black dress, hooker stockings and a fur thing. And she was promptly accused of being overdressed. The winner of the best costume competition was a bloke dressed as Transformer Bumblebee. A man in a black leather Borat costume with a bondage mask and a ball in his mouth was disappointed. Nobody asked the fella wearing nothing but an apron what he thought. Despite what to many people would go down as an outrageous night, this years Hookers Ball was branded conservative by old-timers. Is that a sign of the times? Is the Territory now so sophisticated, so wealthy, that were losing our weirdness? Are we being take over by people in beige cardigans? Hardly! The very fact that the Hookers Ball continues to draw such a big crowd shows that Territorians still know how to have fun especially when nearly naked. ... and another thing INPEX Australia boss Seiya Ito should be congratulated for doing his best to become an Aussie. He finishes every speech with no worries or, more recently, dont worry too much. The Northern Territory News GPO Box 1300 Darwin NT 0801 Editorial facsimile: (08) 8981 6045 xxx Letters to the Editor should be kept to 175 words or less. Send your letters to GPO Box 1300, Darwin, 0801, or email ntnmail@ntnews.com.au You must include your name, home address or PO Box number. Name and address will be withheld on request. The Northern Territory News reserves the right to edit letters 10YEARSAGO THE Territory could have budget airline Virgin flying to the Top End next year, a Territory tourismboss has said. Northern Territory Tourist Commission managing director Tony Mayell flew to Brussels for top-levelmeetings with Virgin chief executive officer Brett Godfrey on Thursday. 20YEARSAGO CANE toads have arrived in the Territory in their millions, according to a NTConservation Commission senior officer, RonHooper. Mr Hooper, head of the commissions flora and fauna resources unit, said the populationwas concentrated south of Borroloola between the town and the Queensland border. 25YEARSAGO TERRITORY sporting identity, Dr Bruce Simmons, haswon the prestigious John HawkinsMemorial Scholarship to undertake further study inmedicine. Dr Simmonswill use the scholarship to complete a Bachelor of Science honors degree in dentistry at Adelaide University. No evidence to back plan NORTHERN Territory Council of Social Services notes with interest Federal Minister Jenny Macklins decision to extend the income management of many Centrelink payments to non-indigenous Territorians from July next year. We support any serious efforts to address the circumstances of disadvantaged Territorians. However, we are concerned at the lack of objective evidence to demonstrate that income management has been successful in the two years that it has been operating in prescribed communities. Available statistics suggest that school attendance has not markedly improved. Reported incidence of alcohol misuse appears to have increased. There is little in the way of concrete evidence to say that children are safer, and minimal objective data to indicate that consumption of fresh fruit and vegetables has increased. To avoid any perception of targeting of the undeserving poor we would welcome hard evidence from the Minister to demonstrate that income management measures have been effective on prescribed communities. We believe that the largely anecdotal information which is currently available does not justify an extension of income management. Wendy Morton, Executive director, Northern Territory Council of Social Services Get hunting facts right RE: IRRESPONSIBLE hunting hurts, Northern Territory News, December 7. A fantasy, feel-good letter from someone who does not know better. It is not against the law to hunt geese with rocks, throwing sticks, spears, arrows, rifles and shotguns. Rather, it depends on your skin and food needs. Since the correspondent has questioned NT Parks and Wildlife, he discriminates against a section of the community. Not all hunters must have permits. Not all hunters come under wildlife protection laws. And he goes on and on with out telling us how he knows where the geese came from or how he knows the odd goose cause of death. Also the geese might be taking refuge from mango crop mitigation. We dont know the circumstances of this sad event or whether an adult or child was responsible, but there is no excuse for inflicting cruelty on our game birds. It is a pity Mr Anonymous did not think about a humane way to end the suffering of the bird too mobile to catch, but most likely stressed further by his chase. I would see this as irresponsible and a demonstration of hypocrisy. The plight of this crippled goose with an arrow stuck in its wound would upset most people and have them trying to find answers to prevent more of the same. For a deadly shot at small targets, even a highly skilled bow hunter needs a lot of luck and to me this method of hunting waterfowl is highly questionable from the humane and safety viewpoints. It is common to see around Darwin thousands of magpie geese taking themselves to parks, orchards and back yards to feed. To say this is a result of hunting pressure is without fact. I sincerely hope NT Parks and Wildlife will not waste taxpayers money on a reply to Mr Anonymous. MJC Hunter, Conservationist Law needs to change A JUVENILE who has been trained and educated is less likely to vandalise the property of others. In his letter (Charge the parents, NT News, December 5), Grant Chandler rightly asks for parents to be held responsible for juvenile vandalism, to pay for the damage. Grant is quite right. A parent who has been made to pay is much more likely to educate his/her child on what is expected and demanded of them on how to live in the general community. So, law makers, why do you not have the bottle to create such legislation? Are you too frightened of the inevitable bleeding heart protest? Perhaps it is time to listen to the desires of the majority? Howard Young, Kununurra


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