Territory Stories

Training the Territory

Details:

Title

Training the Territory

Collection

Training the Territory; E-Journals; PublicationNT

Date

2006-02-01

Description

This publication contains may contain links to external sites. These external sites may no longer be active.; Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Notes

Date:2006-02

Language

English

Subject

Vocational education -- Northern Territory -- Periodicals; Occupational training -- Northern Territory -- Periodicals

Publisher name

Dept. of Employment, Education and Training

Place of publication

Darwin

Volume

issue 1

Copyright owner

Check within Publication or with content Publisher.

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/212423

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/716411

Page content

operational areas of the business, including housekeeping, laundry, food service, tour guiding, offi ce administration and maintenance. The business employed some fi fty Titjikala community members in various tasks during 2005. In 2006, DEET will again support continued tourism training at Titjikala and has allocated $40 000 to ensure people have access to training and employment opportunities. Maningrida - Bawinanga Aboriginal Corporation, Babbarra Womens Centre DEET is continuing to support the communitys Womens Centre by providing $4 310 towards a training workshop to train Indigenous women in the art of two colour silkscreen printing. The one-week silkscreen training workshop with be conducted by trainer Bobbie Ruben in two colour printing on continuous lengths of fabric as a follow up to a 2004 workshop in introduction to silk screening. The aim of the training is to build on the skills learnt in a previous course and create employment pathways for the women in production of silk screen fabrics for their retail outlet at Maningrida. It will also ensure continued supply of new silkscreen prints for designers in Darwin. Long-term objectives are the recognition for the Babbarra Womens Centre in silkscreen designs and to generate self funded full time positions for the Womens Centre artists through the sale of their textile art. Interest in the training is being shown by some of the younger female Indigenous students attending Maningrida School and they are being provided access to training via the VET in Schools Program. Training News from Around the Territory Grader Training for Alpurrurulam Council Civil Construction Team Four men from Alpurrurulam Community Government Councils CDEP Civil Construction team have recently commenced a 240 hour accredited Grader Operations training program. Being delivered by the Centre for Appropriate Technology, this unit concludes a 2 x stagetraining program which covered backhoe and skid steer operations, medium and heavy rigid licensing and occupational health and safety training. Alpurrurulam Council has already successfully tendered for and completed civil construction contracts in the region, and this training will ensure that the Council can maintain a skilled civil construction workforce to complete contracts professionally, within budget and on time. DEET has provided $15,360 in Flexible Response Funding (FRF) for this unit alone, bringing the total cost of the program to approximatley $42,000. Forklift Training Six CDEP workers from Darwin Regional CDEP will undertake a 40 hour forklift training program. The training will provide the participants with skills to undertake work requirements with their host employers and provides the necessary employability skills for participants to apply for jobs to make the transition from CDEP to employment with private sector organisations in Darwin. Industry Services Training will deliver the training with over $2000 being provided by DEET to support the program. 13


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

We use temporary cookies on this site to provide functionality.
By continuing to use this site without changing your settings, you consent to our use of cookies.