Territory Stories

The Northern Territory news Fri 15 Nov 2019

Details:

Title

The Northern Territory news Fri 15 Nov 2019

Other title

NT news

Collection

The Northern Territory news; NewspaperNT

Date

2019-11-15

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin

Publisher name

News Corp Australia

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

News Corp Australia

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Series/C1968A00063

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/756442

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/762929

Page content

16 NEWS FRIDAY NOVEMBER 15 2019 NTNE01Z01MA - V1 Locals rally to help Macca in new battle LUKE HAYES luke.hayes@news.com.au TERRITORIAN quadriplegic and advocate for disability Paul Macca McKenzie has been flown to Melbourne to fight against a flesh-eating infection that has taken hold of his body. The infection, called pseudomonas aeruginosa, came partially as a result of being bound to his wheelchair, day in and day out. Mr McKenzie arrived at Austin Hospital two weeks ago to undergo radical wound care, skin grafts and a reconstruction of his rectal area to try to allow him to sit upright in a chair again. Currently he is still going under the knife regularly to remove flesh in order to stay ahead of the infection, which antibiotics are still trying to kill off. Mr McKenzies sister Karen McLardy told the NT News if the infection doesnt spread, chances of recovery were improved. As long as it doesnt get into his bones, he should be safe, she said. Theyre trying to stay ahead by cutting out more flesh. Theres always a risk that they might have to amputate a leg to keep the infection at bay. Theres also a risk that he may never get back in a chair and have to lie on his back for the rest of his life, which would be awful. Treatments in Melbourne could go on for the next 12 months. Mr McKenzies partner Jess and two-year-old daughter Eleven have flown south to be by his side, leaving the family with no one earning an income. This comes while they are still paying a mortgage on their Darwin home and try ing to find semi-permanent accommodation in Melbourne. Ms McLardy said despite Mr McKenzies trademark resilience and grit, the experience had taken a toll on him mentally. He was extremely sick by the time they rushed him to hospital, it had gone way past where it should have, she said. When I talk to him, which is nearly every day, hes been pretty upset. Its awful. Its so not like him, because hes a big and tough bloke. He just wants to live, hes got a two-year-old child and Jess. A GoFundMe campaign has been set up online to aid Mr McKenzie and his family with expenses, with over $9500 being raised in support over the last week. Those wishing to support Mr McKenzie and his family in their battle against infection can do so at gofundme.com/f/elevenneeds-her-dad Howard Springs quadriplegic Paul McKenzie, with his daughter Eleven Picture: JESSICA PARKER ETU calls for sacking of Minister Wakefield LUKE HAYES Dale Wakefield Union laws not over line THE passage of laws making it easier to deregister unions and ban officials has been delayed, with the Government yet to drum up crossbench support. The Governments ensuring integrity bill will not be voted on in parliament this week, leaving the final sitting fortnight to get it in place. Pauline Hanson and independent Jacqui Lambie hold the key, with support from either senator enough to clinch victory for the Government. But the One Nation leader, who controls two votes, and Senator Lambie are yet to come on board. Attorney-General Christian Porter, who is also industrial relations minister, said the Government negotiated with crossbench senators this week. THE Electrical Trade Union have called for Energy Minister Dale Wakefield to be sacked for prematurely closing an Alice Springs power station. Central Australia power failures caused loss of stock to businesses and left homes without airconditioning during 40 degree October heat. ETU NT secretary Peter Ong said early closure of the Ron Goodin Power Station on November 12 was in direct breach of a motion passed at the Labor conference. The call for Ms Wakefields sacking comes ahead of results of an independent investigation into the October 13 blackout. Mr Ong said the revelations were evidence of incompetence from Territory Generation management and Minister Wakefield. The NT Government and TGen were warned about the risks associated with their botched handling of the transition from Ron Goodin to Owen Springs, said Mr Ong. Ms Wakefield said the review would identify what caused the blackout. She refuted the ETUs claims that Ron Goodin Power Station closed prematurely. Ron Goodin Power Station has not closed. On the 12 November, the system controller issued revised operating instructions which direct Territory Generation to use the machines at Owen Springs Power Station first and Ron Goodin second, she said. Cannabis inquiry victory BARRIERS to accessing medicinal cannabis will be scrutinised during a parliamentary inquiry looking at how Australia regulates the drug. The Greens won support for the inquiry 35 votes to 31 yesterday, with Labor and crossbench senators helping the minor party to defeat the Government. The Senates community af fairs committee will look at the suitability of medicinal cannabis for government subsidies through the Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme. It will also compare Australias regime to other countries and investigate training and education of doctors in relation to the treatment. The committee is due to report on February 12 next year. Homes to power trade AUSTRALIAN homes could one day become virtual power plants due to the uptake of smart devices, which could see customers and energy companies on equal footing. The agency tasked with creating rules for Australias energy system likens the wouldbe change to eBay or Airbnb. The Australian Energy Market Commission wants feedback on how consumers can benefit from the rise of digital appliances. Latest household batteries, electric vehicles and air conditioners can be programmed to use electricity when its the cheapest, with excess stored power then sold to the grid. AEMC chairman John Pierce expects this practice to become far more widespread.


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