Territory Stories

Weed management plan for gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus) : 2010

Details:

Title

Weed management plan for gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus) : 2010

Other title

Replaced by Weed management plan for Andropogon gayanus (Gamba Grass) 2014

Creator

Northern Territory. Department of Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport. Natural Resources Division

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT; Weed management plan

Date

2010

Description

This Weed Management Plan forms part of a strategic approach to gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus) management in the NT, with the overall aim being to mitigate the damage caused by gamba grass in relation to the natural environment, property and infrastructure and public health. A comprehensive weed risk management assessment found gamba grass to be a very high risk weed where potential exists for successful management.

Notes

Made available by via Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Table of contents

1. Introduction -- 2. Aim and objectives -- 3. Gamba grass declaration status -- 4. Current distribution -- 5. Management requirements -- 6. Eradication and control methods -- 7. Developing a weed seed spread prevention program -- 8. Tracking progress and judging success -- 9. Support and information for land managers -- Appendix A: Summary of management requirements and related actions – gamba grass in class A/C zone -- Appendix B1: Summary of management requirements and related actions – gamba grass in class B/C zone – small landholdings 20ha or less -- Appendix B2: Summary of management requirements and related actions – gamba grass in class B/C zone – large landholdings of more than 20ha -- Appendix C: Summary of management requirements and related actions – gamba grass in public transport or service corridors -- Appendix D: Suggested gamba grass monitoring report template -- Appendix E: Targets -- List of Figures -- List of Tables

Language

English

Subject

Andropogon gayanus; Control; Gamba grass; Weeds

Publisher name

Northern Territory Government

Place of publication

Palmerston

Edition

2010 edition

Series

Weed management plan

Now known as

Weed management plan for Andropogon gayanus (Gamba Grass) 2014

Previously known as

Weed management plan for gamba grass (Andropogon gayanus) : draft August 2009

Format

iii, 31 pages : colour illustrations and maps ; 30 cm

File type

application/pdf

ISBN

9781921519840

Use

Attribution International 4.0 (CC BY 4.0)

Copyright owner

Northern Territory Government

License

https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

Related materials

Submission to the review of the Weed Management Plan for Andropogon Gayanus (Gamba grass) 2010

Related links

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/265105 [Weed management plan for Andropogon gayanus (Gamba Grass) 2014]; https://hdl.handle.net/10070/300740 [Weed management plan for Gamba Grass (Andropogon gayanus) - August 2018]

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/804175

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/805221

Page content

Weed Management Plan for Andropogon gayanus (Gamba Grass) 11 3. design and implement a seed spread prevention program, which will ensure that no new gamba infestations establish as a result of seed transfer or spread along the corridor (refer section 7); 4. notify the Weed Management Branch of the presence of gamba grass in the A/C zone when it is identified in areas in which it has not been found previously; and 5. monitor the results of gamba grass management and keep a record of methods used and management outcomes. 5.6 Permits 1. Section 30 of the Act enables people to apply to the Minister for a permit to use a declared weed. The Minister may refuse or grant a permit subject to a range of conditions. 2. Any person wishing to use or manage gamba grass other than in accordance with this plan, can apply for a permit. Applicants will need to demonstrate that the grant of a permit will not compromise the intent of this plan. If a permit is issued, it will be subject to conditions determined by the Minister. 3. Landholders in the B/C zone who currently have, and use, gamba grass are not required to apply for a permit to use gamba provided its growth and spread is managed in accordance with this plan. 4. Landholders in the A/C zone who currently have, and use, gamba grass area required to apply for a permit if they wish to continue to use the grass. 6. Eradication and control methods 6.1 General Effective gamba grass management is dependent on the application of an integrated natural resource management approach. Weed control will be more successful where land managers are also implementing appropriate grazing regimes, managing feral animals and controlling erosion and fire on their properties. It is recognised that, in some instances, successful weed management outcomes may take time and repeated effort to become clear due to the complexities associated with integrated natural resource management and level of investment requirement. Spread prevention is the most successful and cost effective way of managing weeds. Gamba grass seed can be spread via wind, water, livestock and other animals (e.g. feral pig) and machinery contaminated with seed. It can also be spread if fill, gravel or hay contains seeds (refer to section 7). Further information on the eradication and control methods described in this plan can be found in the Northern Territory Weed Management Handbook. 6.1.1 Integrated weed control There are a range of tools available that may be used to effectively manage gamba grass including grazing land management, physical control, chemical control and fire. Any, or all of these may be used in an integrated manner (if appropriate) in order to achieve more effective management outcomes.


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