Territory Stories

Barkly Regional Council annual report 2018-2019

Details:

Title

Barkly Regional Council annual report 2018-2019

Other title

Annual report 2018-2019

Creator

Barkly Regional Council

Collection

E-Publications; E-Books; PublicationNT; Barkly Regional Council annual report; Annual Report

Date

2019

Notes

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Language

English

Subject

Barkly Regional Council; Periodicals; Local government; Northern Territory; Barkly; Annual report

Publisher name

Barkly Regional Council

Place of publication

Tennant Creek

Series

Barkly Regional Council annual report; Annual Report

Volume

2018 - 2019

Previously known as

Barkly Shire Council annual report

File type

application/pdf

Use

Copyright

Copyright owner

Barkly Regional Council

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00042

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/806845

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/806848

Page content

The Barkly Regional Councils logo was created by Barbara Whippy who incorporated logos from the previous smaller community councils. The base line for the logo is the McDouall Ranges north of Tennant Creek, named by John McDouall Stuart in June, 1860. This was in honour of Colonel James McDouall, of the 2nd Life Guards, Logan and Wigtownshire. Locally they are known as the Honeymoon Ranges so called by the newlyweds camping on their mining leases in the range during the 1930s gold rush. Above, there is a row of symbols starting with the Sandover Lily which represents the Urapuntja or Utopia region, the Lizard which symbolises Nyinkka, a sacred symbol in Tennant Creek, and Emu which characterises Elliott and the surrounding region. The footprint in the centre represents humanity all of the people of the Barkly with the Bat representing Alpurrurulam, Kangaroo characterising Ampilatwatja and Dingo a sacred symbol for Ali Curung. The Tracks of the Barkly logo shows that Barkly Regional Council as represented by the Council laws are listening to the communities and to the people of this vast remote region, not only with their intellects but with their heart. 'A footprint has no colour and humanity has to be there. There were these visual tracks right across the Barkly region.' - Former President Rosalie Kunoth Monks 2016 2017 Annual Report


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