Territory Stories

Sunday Territorian 7 Mar 2021

Details:

Title

Sunday Territorian 7 Mar 2021

Collection

Sunday Territorian; NewspaperNT

Date

2021-03-07

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin.; Australian newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Darwin.

Publisher name

News Corp Australia

Place of publication

Darwin

File type

application\pdf

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

News Corp Australia

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00042

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/826267

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/826422

Page content

SUNDAY MARCH 7 2021 TV 25 V1 - NTNE01Z01MA YOU see it when he scores a goal, posts playtime with his five kids on Instagram, or just when hes larking around at training with his Carlton Football Club teammates. But Eddie Betts beaming smile is also the mask he wears when racism rears its ugly head and the indigenous football star tries to put on a brave face. As he reveals in one of his most candid interviews to date, the 34-year-old has spent years trying to smile through the pain of racial taunts from AFL fans who have targeted him and other Aboriginal players of the game. Starring in a powerful new Amazon Prime Video documentary, Making Their Mark which takes viewers inside the tumultuous 2020 season Betts breaks down the effect racial attacks have had on him and why the codes recent reckoning with its dark past has been a long time coming. The lowest point of his 17-year career, he says, was the moment, in 2016, when a Port Adelaide fan threw a banana at him while he played his heart out for the Adelaide Crows. The 27-year-old woman was fined by police and counselled by the club, but Betts admits he still bears the emotional scars of being likened to a monkey and flinches as he talks about how it haunts him to this day. Id go do [coaching] clinics with the kids throughout Adelaide but little kids, little kids are innocent. Theyd come up laughing Oh, you got a banana thrown at you, ha ha ha ha but it hurts, it really, really hurts. So much so, he explains sadly: I feel weird eating a banana. I feel weird picking up bananas at the shop because I think people are looking at me. Worse yet, the shame has crept into his young sons playtime, tainted by the slur. My sons climbing up a tree and saying, look, Dad, look, Im a little monkey, and I must admit that kind of grinds me a little bit. I dont want to say, No, youre not a little monkey, ... but it grinds me deep down and it hurts that it upsets me. As the AFL examines its issues with racism, and clubs like Collingwood face up to their appalling treatment of indigenous players, Betts says hes only found his voice since Sydney Swans hero and proud Adnyamathanha and Narungga man Adam Goodes was booed out of the game. If it wasnt for Adam Goodes and the way he stood up for what he believed in ... he gave everyone else a voice, Betts says. But to be honest, some kids are still scared to speak up because they dont want what happened to Adam to happen to them. Betts is adamant the AFL should have done more to help and protect Adam and blames himself for not doing more to help Adam. I feel guilty about that, not doing more. But because of Adam, I do believe now I have a voice. His presence and what hes done has made me stronger in what I believe in, and my voice needs to be heard throughout the AFL, throughout Australia in general ... to stand up against racism, to make it a culturally safe spot for young Aboriginal kids to come and play. The gripping seven-part series follows Betts and several other AFL figures, including GWS captain Stephen Coniglio, West Coast Eagles star Nik Naitanui and Richmond Tigers power trio: coach Damien Hardwick, president Peggy ONeal and chief executive Brendon Gale. Fans and those new to the game will get a greater insight into the mental anguish players perform under and the sacrifices it took to stage the season, Betts says. Its going to give people outside of that part of your life, an idea of what its like to be an AFL footballer, and the mental stress that we go through. Returning for what could be his final season with the Blues, Betts has overcome an off-season hamstring injury but expected to be fit to play in round one against the premiers Richmond on Thursday, March 18. The four-time Goal of the Year winner is also enjoying his off-field advocacy role with the club, leading indigenous awareness programs within the community. I enjoy connecting with people and educating people, but I can only do so much, Betts says. [Clubs] need to start educating themselves as well, and want to do it. Not just tick a box. The [Carlton] footy club is improving and the AFL as an organisation is improving, but theres still a lot to be learned. Voice of change Carlton forward Eddie Betts stars in a powerful documentary charting the AFLs most trying year, writes Holly Byrnes extras Fleabag If you liked... If you liked... detective AFTER recently falling down the rabbit hole of French drama and inhaling the brilliant thriller Lupin, this delightful dramedy set in a Parisian talent agency, has become my latest obsession. At the heart of the story is Camille (Fanny Sidney) who moves to the capital from her home on the Cote dAzur, desperate to connect with her estranged father and agent to the stars, Mathias (Thibault de Montalembert). At first, he tries to keep her at arms length, especially since his actor son Hippolyte (Franois Civil) and rich wife, Catherine (Emily In Paris star Philippine Leroy-Beaulieu) dont know his love child exists. But when she stumbles into a job as his office rivals assistant, the story and their secret relationship begins to unravel. The dialogue is snappy and the ensemble a brilliant mix of young and old; but its the real celebrity cameos including Sigourney Weaver (pictured), Monica Bellucci and Juliette Binoche that add extra edge and authenticity to this hilarious and sharply-observed series youll be hooked on quicker than you can say oui. Holly Byrnes FRoM her years as a misfit, the semiautobiographical Chewing Gum is a BAFTA award-winning comedy from the mind of Michaela Coel, creator of I May Destroy You. Its a little bit taboo and a little bit wrong but youll love every character in this story about a very religious girl who wants to break free from the only life shes known and experience all the things shes missed out on including sex. She wants to leave behind adolescence and embrace womanhood, but agonises over having to tackle the challenges of being an adult and her love of all things Beyonc. Get ready for a show that will have you laughing non-stop. call my agent! streaming, netflix chewing gum streaming, Binge Our picks making their mark streaming from friday, amazon prime Video True blue: Making Their Mark follows Carlton star Eddie Betts among others. try try , -- TV . .............................................................................. . . .............................................................................. .


Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain the names, voices and images of people who have died, as well as other culturally sensitive content. Please be aware that some collection items may use outdated phrases or words which reflect the attitude of the creator at the time, and are now considered offensive.

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