Territory Stories

The Centralian Advocate Tue 29 Mar 2022

Details:

Title

The Centralian Advocate Tue 29 Mar 2022

Collection

Centralian Advocate; NewspaperNT

Date

2022-03-29

Description

Made available via the Publications (Legal Deposit) Act 2004 (NT).

Language

English

Subject

Community newspapers -- Northern Territory -- Alice Springs; Tennant Creek (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Alice Springs (N.T.) -- Newspapers; Australia, Central -- Newspapers

Publisher name

News Corp Australia

Place of publication

Darwin

Use

Copyright. Made available by the publisher under licence.

Copyright owner

News Corp Australia

License

https://www.legislation.gov.au/Details/C2019C00042

Parent handle

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/866739

Citation address

https://hdl.handle.net/10070/866741

Page content

28 SPORT Tuesday March 29 2022 NTNE01Z01MA - V1 Paddy McCartin using a phone for medical purposes. THE AFL has granted Paddy McCartin special permission to use a mobile phone during matches after a technological breakthrough that allows the diabetic to measure his blood sugar levels through an app. In what appeared to be a bizarre moment on Friday night, the reborn defender was pictured on Channel 7 using a phone while on the field dur ing the second quarter of the win against Geelong at the SCG. A Swans trainer ran the device out to McCartin after Geelongs Bradley Close booted a goal. McCartin used the phone for about 10 seconds before handing it back and remaining on the field. Its understood McCartin wears a sensor patch that communicates with an app that the former No.1 draft pick uses to check his blood sugar levels more than 10 times each day. AFL integrity rules prohibit the use of mobile phones in match-day restricted areas, with the exception of 10 authorised device users plus media staff. Last year Collingwood was fined $20,000 for breaching AFL Rule 30 when Jordan De Goey accessed the storage case and retrieved two phones, handing one to fellow injured star Jeremy Howe. But the league confirmed that McCartin, one of the feelgood stories of this year, had received an exemption. The AFL confirms Sydney Swans player Paddy McCartin is permitted to use a mobile phone diabetes app during matches for medical purposes only as it is required to monitor his blood sugar levels, a spokesperson said. In recent years, diabetic AFL players have had to come to the interchange bench to measure their blood sugar levels using a glucometer machine. They would have to prick their finger with a needle to draw blood for the machine to read in a process that would take a couple of minutes. They would usually do that at every break and every rotation. McCartins revolutionary diabetes management plan means he can monitor his levels without leaving the field. Diabetic McCartin free to use phone app in matches SAM LANDSBERGER to do in there, he said. We played super well again and it was pretty hot out there but we got it done. Its the perfect start for us, so hopefully we can keep it rolling. Young guns flying high COLLINGWOOD midfielder Patrick Lipinski is thriving on having a clear role after being shunted onto a wing and starved of senior opportunities at his former club. Lipinskis decision to depart the Bulldogs for the Magpies last year could hardly be going better, with his new team 2-0 and him winning 54 disposals across the opening fortnight. Its great fun and Ive got a pretty clear role on what I need Lipinski was a player in demand last year as his AFL chances dwindled at the Bulldogs, where he was stuck behind the likes of Marcus Bontempelli, Jack Macrae, Tom Liberatore, Josh Dunkley and Bailey Smith. The 23-year-old averaged more than 35 touches a week at second-tier level in 2021 but his senior games came mostly as a wingman, which didnt suit his strengths. Dogs coach Luke Beveridges feedback, Lipinski said, subsequently centred on his open-field performance, including tackling and leg speed. He was a bit obsessed with that, Lipinski said. Then there was obviously a great midfield in front of me that I wasnt able to play in and thats probably my best position, so it was a pretty easy choice to come and play midfield here. It just didnt work out for me (at the Bulldogs). Lipinskis strong start to his black and white career hasnt surprised him or Collingwood, but he made a point of saying he was intent on improving rather than trying to prove anyone wrong. Ive always believed in myself, even when things werent going well, he said. I still worked as hard as I do when its going well, but its only two games, so I have to keep it up. But its been great to have that belief from Fly (Craig McRae), because that allows me to play my best, and I get to play to my strengths, so its awesome. First-year coach McRaes encouragement for his players to celebrate their successes and give back to fans drew criticism after the Pies round 1 win, particularly towards young forward Jack Ginnivan. But Ginnivan responded with a career-best game in Collingwoods win over Adelaide on Saturday, and Lipinski was full of praise for the rookie. He dominated and couldnt really have played a better game for a small forward, he said. Marc McGowan Patrick Lipinski. Lance Franklin at the SCG where the match ball with which he kicked his 1000th AFL career goal was returned by Alex Wheeler. Picture: Phil Hillyard ALEX Wheeler, the Swans fan who snaffled the Sherrin that Lance Franklin put through the SCG uprights on Friday night for his 1000th goal, returned it to Buddy on Monday. There was panic when the match ball went missing but Wheeler said he had always intended for it to go to Franklin. There was debate in the 24 hours afterwards among footy fans on what they would do if they were in his position, with most saying they would return the ball. Buddys Sherrin was valued around $200,000 on the open market and Wheeler said on Monday he had been encouraged in some quarters to sell it but felt that wasnt right. I want to see it back at the SCG, he said. Wheeler said Franklins 1000-goal ball had struck him in the head leaving him with a little bruise as fans all around him tried to grab it. Wheeler fled the ground for home soon after in a taxi before heading to the pub for a few celebratory drinks without his temporary souvenir but became paranoid and left early. His mate, Matt King, who filmed Wheeler marking the Sherrin on the night, on Saturday posted on Instagram that the ball would be in Franklins hands this week. The Swans offered before that for Wheeler to present the Sherrin to Franklin. It was ALWAYS buddys ball Marc McGowan HISTORY-making Swans superstar Lance Franklin plans to play on next year and for as long as his body will allow him. Franklin on Friday night became just the sixth VFL/AFL footballer to reach the 1000goal milestone. He revealed on Monday it was a feat he had thought about since he kicked 113 goals in a spectacular 2008 season for Hawthorn. Making the moment more special for Franklin was he achieved it in front of his family, some of whom flew in from the US, as well as Western Australia and South Australia. Franklin also said he was never concerned for his safety as thousands of fans mobbed him on the SCG after his milestone goal sailed through. The wild scenes remain a blur but he said he would forever remember teammates Will Hayward, Nick Blakey, Isaac Heeney and Tom Hickey being the first by his side to celebrate. I was lapping it up, to be honest with you a little bit of carry on, Franklin said. When I kicked the 100 goals in 2008; at that stage, I was very young and I thought if I ever got to the 1000 goals, Im really going to enjoy it and so I really soaked it up. At no stage for me was I nervous or scared of the crowd but it was just a special moment. I absolutely loved it. A lot of the boys that were involved in it would have thought the same. Franklin wants to play on Marc McGowan


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